Mental stress-induced haemoconcentration: sex differences and mechanisms

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@article{e4a4dcc25a644535a780609b784c9481,
title = "Mental stress-induced haemoconcentration: sex differences and mechanisms",
abstract = "Given the possible role of hemoconcentration in myocardial infarction and apparent sex differences in susceptibility, three studies examined sex differences in mental stress-induced hemoconcentration, and explored possible underlying mechanisms. Blood pressure, heart rate, and hematocrit were monitored at rest and in response to a mental stress task that was contrived to be increasingly provocative across the three studies. This was confirmed by self-report, performance, and cardiovascular reactivity data. The most convincing evidence for hemoconcentration effects and sex differences in hemoconcentration emerged from exposure to the more provocative of the stress tasks, with men also showing greater hemoconcentration than women. Blood pressure reactivity was a strong and consistent predictor of stress-induced hemoconcentration. These findings may help to explain sex differences in susceptibility to myocardial infarction.",
keywords = "mental stress, blood pressure, sex differences, hemoconcentration",
author = "{Veldhuijzen van Zanten}, Joachimina and Christopher Ring and Victoria Burns and KM Edwards and Mark Drayson and Douglas Carroll",
year = "2004",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1469-8986.2004.00190.x",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "541--551",
journal = "Psychophysiology",
issn = "0048-5772",
publisher = "Wiley Online Library",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mental stress-induced haemoconcentration: sex differences and mechanisms

AU - Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Joachimina

AU - Ring, Christopher

AU - Burns, Victoria

AU - Edwards, KM

AU - Drayson, Mark

AU - Carroll, Douglas

PY - 2004/7/1

Y1 - 2004/7/1

N2 - Given the possible role of hemoconcentration in myocardial infarction and apparent sex differences in susceptibility, three studies examined sex differences in mental stress-induced hemoconcentration, and explored possible underlying mechanisms. Blood pressure, heart rate, and hematocrit were monitored at rest and in response to a mental stress task that was contrived to be increasingly provocative across the three studies. This was confirmed by self-report, performance, and cardiovascular reactivity data. The most convincing evidence for hemoconcentration effects and sex differences in hemoconcentration emerged from exposure to the more provocative of the stress tasks, with men also showing greater hemoconcentration than women. Blood pressure reactivity was a strong and consistent predictor of stress-induced hemoconcentration. These findings may help to explain sex differences in susceptibility to myocardial infarction.

AB - Given the possible role of hemoconcentration in myocardial infarction and apparent sex differences in susceptibility, three studies examined sex differences in mental stress-induced hemoconcentration, and explored possible underlying mechanisms. Blood pressure, heart rate, and hematocrit were monitored at rest and in response to a mental stress task that was contrived to be increasingly provocative across the three studies. This was confirmed by self-report, performance, and cardiovascular reactivity data. The most convincing evidence for hemoconcentration effects and sex differences in hemoconcentration emerged from exposure to the more provocative of the stress tasks, with men also showing greater hemoconcentration than women. Blood pressure reactivity was a strong and consistent predictor of stress-induced hemoconcentration. These findings may help to explain sex differences in susceptibility to myocardial infarction.

KW - mental stress

KW - blood pressure

KW - sex differences

KW - hemoconcentration

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=3042713108&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2004.00190.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2004.00190.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 15189477

VL - 41

SP - 541

EP - 551

JO - Psychophysiology

JF - Psychophysiology

SN - 0048-5772

ER -