"They're made in factories and not by witches on the allotment": a qualitative study of midlife women in the United Kingdom, exploring their approaches to complementary and alternative medicines

Antje Lindenmeyer, Kimberly Jamie, Frances Griffiths, France Légaré

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
273 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article explores midlife women's experiences and approaches related to complementary and alternative therapies (CAMS). Ninety-six midlife women were asked about their use of CAMs as part of their overall approach to midlife health. Qualitative thematic analysis was combined with a case-based approach. Women set their experience of CAMs in the context of conventional medicine taking and discussed their safety and different uses. For treatments requiring direct contact with a practitioner, accessibility and quality of the relationship were crucial. Four overall approaches could be discerned (political-critical, pragmatic, careful and wellbeing-oriented) that dynamically interacted with women's experiences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1046-67
Number of pages22
JournalHealth Care for Women International
Volume32
Issue number12
Early online date16 Nov 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

Keywords

  • Questionnaires
  • Attitude to Health
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Women's Health
  • Humans
  • Quality of Life
  • Great Britain
  • Complementary Therapies
  • Women's Health Services
  • Patient Education as Topic
  • Self Concept
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care
  • Adult
  • Holistic Health
  • Middle Aged
  • Female

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