The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Physics

Eleanor Knox (Editor), Alastair Wilson (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportAnthology

Abstract

The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Physics is a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the state of the art in the philosophy of physics. It comprisess 54 self-contained chapters written by leading philosophers of physics at both senior and junior levels, making it the most thorough and detailed volume of its type on the market – nearly every major perspective in the field is represented.

The Companion’s 54 chapters are organized into 12 parts. The first seven parts cover all of the major physical theories investigated by philosophers of physics today, and the last five explore key themes that unite the study of these theories.

I. Newtonian Mechanics
II. Special Relativity
III. General Relativity
IV. Non-Relativistic Quantum Theory
V. Quantum Field Theory
VI. Quantum Gravity
VII. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics
VIII. Explanation
IX. Intertheoretic Relations
X. Symmetries
XI. Metaphysics
XII. Cosmology

The difficulty level of the chapters has been carefully pitched so as to offer both accessible summaries for those new to philosophy of physics and standard reference points for active researchers on the front lines. An introductory chapter by the editors maps out the field, and each part also begins with a short summary that places the individual chapters in context. The volume will be indispensable to any serious student or scholar of philosophy of physics.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherRoutledge
Number of pages786
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781315623818
ISBN (Print)9781138653078
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2021

Publication series

NameRoutledge Philosophy Companions
PublisherRoutledge

Keywords

  • physics
  • philosophy
  • philosophy of physics
  • mechanics
  • relativity
  • cosmology
  • metaphysics
  • quantum
  • space
  • time
  • matter

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