The Jamaica discipline and the epochal nature of English Atlantic privateering and piracy, 1660–1726

Nathan T. Jopling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The idea of the ‘Jamaica discipline’ suggests that all Anglo-American privateering and pirate groups operating between 1660 and 1726 were linked via a common set of ideas, such as democracy and an aversion to Caribbean elites. The idea has been influential in shaping both scholarly and popular perceptions of seventeenth-century privateers and eighteenth-century pirates. This article argues that the Jamaica discipline is not applicable to seventeenth-century privateers, but rather creates a fundamental misunderstanding of them. Seventeenth-century privateers were not as unified as the idea of them having a discipline suggests. They were not nearly as radical as the discipline posits, yet they did have a set of social norms that developed over the period. The article suggests that the notion of a ‘discipline’ that united pirates and privateers across the 1660–1726 period should be jettisoned, as it oversimplifies the complexities that dictated the presence of different social norms in the period.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Maritime History
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Mar 2023

Keywords

  • Atlantic
  • Caribbean
  • Jamaica discipline
  • piracy
  • privateering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Jamaica discipline and the epochal nature of English Atlantic privateering and piracy, 1660–1726'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this