The Acute Effects of Interval-Type Exercise on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Subjects: Importance of Interval Length. A Controlled, Counterbalanced, Crossover Study

Ida Jakobsen, Thomas Solomon, Kristian Karstoft

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6 Citations (Scopus)
149 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Interval-type exercise is effective for improving glycemic control, but the optimal approach is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of the interval length on changes in postprandial glycemic control following a single exercise bout. Twelve subjects with type 2 diabetes completed a cross-over study with three 1-hour interventions performed in a non-randomized but counter-balanced order: 1) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 3 min slow (aiming for 54% of Peak oxygen consumption rate [VO2peak]) and 3 min fast (aiming for 89% of VO2peak) walking (IW3); 2) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 1 min slow and 1 min fast walking (IW1) and 3) No walking (CON). The exercise interventions were matched with regards to walking speed, and VO2 and heart rate was assessed throughout all interventions. A 4-hour liquid mixed meal tolerance test commenced 30 min after each intervention, with blood samples taken regularly. IW3 and IW1 resulted in comparable mean VO2 and heart rates. Overall mean postprandial blood glucose levels were lower after IW3 compared to CON (10.3±3.0 vs. 11.1±3.3 mmol/L; P < 0.05), with no significant differences between IW1 (10.5±2.8 mmol/L) and CON or IW3 and IW1 (P > 0.05 for both). Conversely blood glucose levels at specific time points during the MMTT differed significantly following both IW3 and IW1 as compared to CON. Our findings support the previously found blood glucose lowering effect of IW3 and suggest that reducing the interval length, while keeping the walking speed and time spend on fast and slow walking constant, does not result in additional improvements.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0163562
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Oct 2016

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