Patient-reported outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease: a measurement of effect in research and clinical care

Jane Fletcher, Sheldon C. Cooper, Amelia Swift

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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Abstract

The measurement of outcomes is key in evaluating healthcare or research interventions in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In patient-centred care, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are central to this evaluation. In this review, we provide an overview of validated, adult disease-specific PROMs developed for use in IBD. Our aim is to assist clinicians and researchers in selection of PROMs to measure outcomes in their patient cohort. The Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments database of systematic reviews was the primary resource used to identify PROMs used in IBD. Search terms were ‘Crohn’s disease’, ‘ulcerative colitis’, and ‘IBD’. Seven systematic reviews were identified from this search. In addition, the publication by the IBD Core Outcome Set Working Group was used to identify further PROMs. Three systematic reviews were excluded as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. From the five included systematic reviews, we identified 21 PROMs and their shortened versions. In conclusion, it does not appear that any one PROM is entirely suitable for both research and clinical practice. Overall, the IBDQ-32 is most widely used in research but has the limitation of cost, whereas the IBD-Control has been recommended in the clinical core outcome set.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-237
Number of pages13
JournalGastroenterology Insights
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 May 2021

Keywords

  • Core outcome sets
  • Disability
  • HRQOL
  • IBD-Control
  • IBDQ
  • PROM
  • Quality of life
  • Questionnaire
  • Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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