Multi-Hazard Effects of Crosswinds on Cascading Failures of Conventional and Interspersed Railway Tracks Exposed to Ballast Washaway and Moving Train Loads

Hao Fu, Yushi Yang, Sakdirat Kaewunruen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

The interspersed railway track is an enhanced timber railway track, spot-replacing damaged wooden sleepers with new concrete sleepers to improve the bearing capacity of existing railway lines. Although this interspersed solution is characterised by low cost and short maintenance time, the interspersed tracks have worse stability than concrete tracks and can deteriorate quickly when exposed to extreme weather conditions such as heavy rains and floods. In many cases, heavy rains and floods are accompanied by strong winds. Ballast washaway can often be observed under flood conditions while the mass of trains is unevenly distributed on two rails due to the effect of lateral wind load and rail irregularities. The current work is the first in the world to investigate the collective multi-hazard effects of ballast washway and uneven axle loads on the vulnerability of conventional and interspersed railway tracks using nonlinear FEM software, STRAND 7. The train bogie is modelled by two sets of point loads. The maximum displacement, bending moment and twists have been studied to evaluate the worst condition. The novel insights will help the railway industry develop proper operations of interspersed railway tracks against naturally hazardous conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1786
Number of pages19
JournalSensors (Switzerland)
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Feb 2023

Keywords

  • vulnerability
  • railway
  • interspersed tracks
  • finite element method
  • extreme conditions
  • multi hazards
  • cascading failure
  • resilience
  • Article

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