A Human Factors Study of Technology Acceptance of a Prototype Mobile Augmented Reality System for Science Education

Theodoros Arvanitis, Debbie Williams, James Knight, Christopher Baber, M Gargalakos, S Sotiriou, FX Bogner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)
1055 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper presents a novel implementation of an extended technology acceptance model to gain insight into user perceptions, attitudes and beliefs toward a mobile augmented reality system for science education. Results were collected during the initial testing of a prototype system, with the specific intent to diagnose misspecifications of user requirements, receive appropriate feedback and integrate it within the design lifecycle of the product. The research model used in this study monitored several affective, motivational and cognitive factors of user acceptance. Findings from the study show that the augmented technology acceptance model accurately represents student evaluation and reactions, even after a short initial experience of hands-on usage of the system. Empirical evidence supports moderating effects upon the core perceptual constructs by taking into account wearability aspects across dimensions of user comfort and exertion, and gender differences as well.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3342-3352
Number of pages11
JournalAdvanced Science Letters
Volume4
Issue number11-12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2011

Keywords

  • E-Learning
  • Wearability
  • User Requirements
  • Augmented Reality
  • Usability Evaluation
  • Technology Acceptance

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Human Factors Study of Technology Acceptance of a Prototype Mobile Augmented Reality System for Science Education'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this