What factors influence a family’s decision to agree to organ donation? A critical literature review

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

What factors influence a family’s decision to agree to organ donation? A critical literature review. / Miller, Cathy; Breakwell, Richard.

In: London Journal of Primary Care, Vol. 10, No. 4, 04.07.2018, p. 103-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{c39c56486c13439986c4202b9cbf1fa4,
title = "What factors influence a family{\textquoteright}s decision to agree to organ donation? A critical literature review",
abstract = "Background:There is a shortage of organs for transplantation in the UK. However, whilst 82% of the population consider donating their organs, only 35% of people have joined the NHS Organ Donor Register. Although the Human Tissue Acts (2004, 2006) and Human Transplantation (Wales) Act (2013) state that the wishes of the deceased cannot be vetoed, it is unlikely that healthcare teams will continue with the retrieval process without the family{\textquoteright}s agreement to proceed.Aim:To understand what influences the decision of families to donate in order to guide clinical practice, education, training and increase donation rates to 80% in line with the NHS Blood and Transplant–Taking Organ Donation to 2020 strategy. Method: A literature review of published research. Results: Seven papers met the inclusion criteria. Several significant factors were identified that influence family decisions, including prior knowledge of the deceased{\textquoteright}s wishes (e.g. carrying a donor card), presence at the time of the donor{\textquoteright}s injury, understanding of brain stem death testing, {\textquoteleft}personal realisation{\textquoteright} of death and hospital related factors (e.g. information, communication and care). These were organised to form the acronym DONATE that serves as a useful mnemonic to guide the requester prior to discussing organ donation. Conclusions: Rates of donation of organ donation may increase through understanding family decision-making.",
keywords = "brain death, family and consent, Organ donation",
author = "Cathy Miller and Richard Breakwell",
year = "2018",
month = jul,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/17571472.2018.1459226",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "103--107",
journal = "London Journal of Primary Care",
issn = "1755-9146",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - What factors influence a family’s decision to agree to organ donation? A critical literature review

AU - Miller, Cathy

AU - Breakwell, Richard

PY - 2018/7/4

Y1 - 2018/7/4

N2 - Background:There is a shortage of organs for transplantation in the UK. However, whilst 82% of the population consider donating their organs, only 35% of people have joined the NHS Organ Donor Register. Although the Human Tissue Acts (2004, 2006) and Human Transplantation (Wales) Act (2013) state that the wishes of the deceased cannot be vetoed, it is unlikely that healthcare teams will continue with the retrieval process without the family’s agreement to proceed.Aim:To understand what influences the decision of families to donate in order to guide clinical practice, education, training and increase donation rates to 80% in line with the NHS Blood and Transplant–Taking Organ Donation to 2020 strategy. Method: A literature review of published research. Results: Seven papers met the inclusion criteria. Several significant factors were identified that influence family decisions, including prior knowledge of the deceased’s wishes (e.g. carrying a donor card), presence at the time of the donor’s injury, understanding of brain stem death testing, ‘personal realisation’ of death and hospital related factors (e.g. information, communication and care). These were organised to form the acronym DONATE that serves as a useful mnemonic to guide the requester prior to discussing organ donation. Conclusions: Rates of donation of organ donation may increase through understanding family decision-making.

AB - Background:There is a shortage of organs for transplantation in the UK. However, whilst 82% of the population consider donating their organs, only 35% of people have joined the NHS Organ Donor Register. Although the Human Tissue Acts (2004, 2006) and Human Transplantation (Wales) Act (2013) state that the wishes of the deceased cannot be vetoed, it is unlikely that healthcare teams will continue with the retrieval process without the family’s agreement to proceed.Aim:To understand what influences the decision of families to donate in order to guide clinical practice, education, training and increase donation rates to 80% in line with the NHS Blood and Transplant–Taking Organ Donation to 2020 strategy. Method: A literature review of published research. Results: Seven papers met the inclusion criteria. Several significant factors were identified that influence family decisions, including prior knowledge of the deceased’s wishes (e.g. carrying a donor card), presence at the time of the donor’s injury, understanding of brain stem death testing, ‘personal realisation’ of death and hospital related factors (e.g. information, communication and care). These were organised to form the acronym DONATE that serves as a useful mnemonic to guide the requester prior to discussing organ donation. Conclusions: Rates of donation of organ donation may increase through understanding family decision-making.

KW - brain death

KW - family and consent

KW - Organ donation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050825347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17571472.2018.1459226

DO - 10.1080/17571472.2018.1459226

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85050825347

VL - 10

SP - 103

EP - 107

JO - London Journal of Primary Care

JF - London Journal of Primary Care

SN - 1755-9146

IS - 4

ER -