What does the evidence tell us about ‘thinking and working politically’ in development assistance?

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Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • World Resources Institute

Abstract

This paper provides a critical review of the evidence on ‘thinking and working politically’ (TWP) in development. Scholars and practitioners have increasingly recognised that development is a fundamentally political process, and there are concerted efforts underway to develop more politically-informed and adaptive ways of thinking and working in providing development assistance. However, while there are interesting and engaging case studies in the emerging, largely practitioner-based literature, these do not yet constitute a strong evidence base that shows these efforts can be clearly linked to more effective aid programming. Much of the evidence used so far to support these approaches is anecdotal, does not meet high standards for a robust body of evidence, is not comparative and draws on a small number of self-selected, relatively well-known success stories written primarily by programme insiders. The paper discusses the factors identified in the TWP literature that are said to enable politically-informed programmes to increase aid effectiveness. It then looks at the state of the evidence on TWP in three areas: political context, sector, and organisation. The aim is to show where research efforts have been targeted so far and to provide guidance on where the field might focus next. In the final section, the paper outlines some ways of testing the core assumptions of the TWP agenda more thoroughly, to provide a clearer sense of the contribution it can make to aid effectiveness.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-168
Number of pages14
JournalPolitics and Governance
Volume7
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • aid effectiveness, development assistance, donors, evidence, governance, politics, ; thinking and working politically