Wearable Contact Lens Biosensors for Continuous Glucose Monitoring Using Smartphones

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Wearable Contact Lens Biosensors for Continuous Glucose Monitoring Using Smartphones. / Elsherif, Mohamed; Hassan, Mohammed Umair; Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider.

In: ACS Nano, Vol. 12, No. 6, 26.06.2018, p. 5452-5462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Elsherif, Mohamed ; Hassan, Mohammed Umair ; Yetisen, Ali K ; Butt, Haider. / Wearable Contact Lens Biosensors for Continuous Glucose Monitoring Using Smartphones. In: ACS Nano. 2018 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 5452-5462.

Bibtex

@article{243fe0d70efb44f6a609c7ea94db6031,
title = "Wearable Contact Lens Biosensors for Continuous Glucose Monitoring Using Smartphones",
abstract = "Low-cost, robust, and reusable continuous glucose monitoring systems that can provide quantitative measurements at point-of-care settings is an unmet medical need. Optical glucose sensors require complex and time-consuming fabrication processes, and their readouts are not practical for quantitative analyses. Here, a wearable contact lens optical sensor was created for the continuous quantification of glucose at physiological conditions, simplifying the fabrication process and facilitating smartphone readouts. A photonic microstructure having a periodicity of 1.6 μm was printed on a glucose-selective hydrogel film functionalized with phenylboronic acid. Upon binding with glucose, the microstructure volume swelled, which modulated the periodicity constant. The resulting change in the Bragg diffraction modulated the space between zero- and first-order spots. A correlation was established between the periodicity constant and glucose concentration within 0-50 mM. The sensitivity of the sensor was 12 nm mM-1, and the saturation response time was less than 30 min. The sensor was integrated with commercial contact lenses and utilized for continuous glucose monitoring using smartphone camera readouts. The reflected power of the first-order diffraction was measured via a smartphone application and correlated to the glucose concentrations. A short response time of 3 s and a saturation time of 4 min was achieved in the continuous monitoring mode. Glucose-sensitive photonic microstructures may have applications in point-of-care continuous monitoring devices and diagnostics at home settings.",
keywords = "contact lenses, glucose sensors, phenylboronic acid, photonic nanostructures, smartphone diagnostics, wearable sensors",
author = "Mohamed Elsherif and Hassan, {Mohammed Umair} and Yetisen, {Ali K} and Haider Butt",
year = "2018",
month = jun,
day = "26",
doi = "10.1021/acsnano.8b00829",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "5452--5462",
journal = "ACS Nano",
issn = "1936-0851",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wearable Contact Lens Biosensors for Continuous Glucose Monitoring Using Smartphones

AU - Elsherif, Mohamed

AU - Hassan, Mohammed Umair

AU - Yetisen, Ali K

AU - Butt, Haider

PY - 2018/6/26

Y1 - 2018/6/26

N2 - Low-cost, robust, and reusable continuous glucose monitoring systems that can provide quantitative measurements at point-of-care settings is an unmet medical need. Optical glucose sensors require complex and time-consuming fabrication processes, and their readouts are not practical for quantitative analyses. Here, a wearable contact lens optical sensor was created for the continuous quantification of glucose at physiological conditions, simplifying the fabrication process and facilitating smartphone readouts. A photonic microstructure having a periodicity of 1.6 μm was printed on a glucose-selective hydrogel film functionalized with phenylboronic acid. Upon binding with glucose, the microstructure volume swelled, which modulated the periodicity constant. The resulting change in the Bragg diffraction modulated the space between zero- and first-order spots. A correlation was established between the periodicity constant and glucose concentration within 0-50 mM. The sensitivity of the sensor was 12 nm mM-1, and the saturation response time was less than 30 min. The sensor was integrated with commercial contact lenses and utilized for continuous glucose monitoring using smartphone camera readouts. The reflected power of the first-order diffraction was measured via a smartphone application and correlated to the glucose concentrations. A short response time of 3 s and a saturation time of 4 min was achieved in the continuous monitoring mode. Glucose-sensitive photonic microstructures may have applications in point-of-care continuous monitoring devices and diagnostics at home settings.

AB - Low-cost, robust, and reusable continuous glucose monitoring systems that can provide quantitative measurements at point-of-care settings is an unmet medical need. Optical glucose sensors require complex and time-consuming fabrication processes, and their readouts are not practical for quantitative analyses. Here, a wearable contact lens optical sensor was created for the continuous quantification of glucose at physiological conditions, simplifying the fabrication process and facilitating smartphone readouts. A photonic microstructure having a periodicity of 1.6 μm was printed on a glucose-selective hydrogel film functionalized with phenylboronic acid. Upon binding with glucose, the microstructure volume swelled, which modulated the periodicity constant. The resulting change in the Bragg diffraction modulated the space between zero- and first-order spots. A correlation was established between the periodicity constant and glucose concentration within 0-50 mM. The sensitivity of the sensor was 12 nm mM-1, and the saturation response time was less than 30 min. The sensor was integrated with commercial contact lenses and utilized for continuous glucose monitoring using smartphone camera readouts. The reflected power of the first-order diffraction was measured via a smartphone application and correlated to the glucose concentrations. A short response time of 3 s and a saturation time of 4 min was achieved in the continuous monitoring mode. Glucose-sensitive photonic microstructures may have applications in point-of-care continuous monitoring devices and diagnostics at home settings.

KW - contact lenses

KW - glucose sensors

KW - phenylboronic acid

KW - photonic nanostructures

KW - smartphone diagnostics

KW - wearable sensors

U2 - 10.1021/acsnano.8b00829

DO - 10.1021/acsnano.8b00829

M3 - Article

C2 - 29750502

VL - 12

SP - 5452

EP - 5462

JO - ACS Nano

JF - ACS Nano

SN - 1936-0851

IS - 6

ER -