Water use of the UK thermal electricity generation fleet by 2050: Part 1 identifying the problem

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Water use of the UK thermal electricity generation fleet by 2050: Part 1 identifying the problem. / Quinn, Andrew; Murrant, Daniel; Chapman, Lee; Heaton, Chris.

In: Energy Policy, Vol. 108, 09.2017, p. 844-858.

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@article{fcb59b01ec7f4b3f9dbad0272b9402ec,
title = "Water use of the UK thermal electricity generation fleet by 2050: Part 1 identifying the problem",
abstract = "The effects of increasing water and energy demand pose a growing threat to national infrastructure strategies. Within the UK there is concern that a future lack of water will compromise the UK's current energy policy to meet an increasing demand for electricity by more thermal generation. This paper investigates this by modelling the water demand of the UK's thermal generation in 2030 and 2050 for several future electricity generation pathways. Unlike previous studies this paper has obtained water abstraction and consumption figures specific to the UK.While the water demands were heavily pathway dependent this study finds for the thermal generation pathways there is a serious mismatch between the assumed freshwater available at 2030 and 2050, its expected actual availability, and an understanding of the implications this has for future generation costs. It is shown that a solution is to make greater use of the UK's seawater resource. This study finds the emphasis UK energy policy gives to the competing poles of low cost electricity generation and environmental protection will have significant impacts on the cost and make-up of the UK's future electricity generation portfolio. A companion paper will consider the generation cost issues if seawater is not available.",
keywords = "Power station cooling, Water-energy Nexus, UK energy policy, Water resources, Climate Change",
author = "Andrew Quinn and Daniel Murrant and Lee Chapman and Chris Heaton",
year = "2017",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1016/j.enpol.2017.05.011",
language = "English",
volume = "108",
pages = "844--858",
journal = "Energy Policy",
issn = "0301-4215",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Water use of the UK thermal electricity generation fleet by 2050: Part 1 identifying the problem

AU - Quinn, Andrew

AU - Murrant, Daniel

AU - Chapman, Lee

AU - Heaton, Chris

PY - 2017/9

Y1 - 2017/9

N2 - The effects of increasing water and energy demand pose a growing threat to national infrastructure strategies. Within the UK there is concern that a future lack of water will compromise the UK's current energy policy to meet an increasing demand for electricity by more thermal generation. This paper investigates this by modelling the water demand of the UK's thermal generation in 2030 and 2050 for several future electricity generation pathways. Unlike previous studies this paper has obtained water abstraction and consumption figures specific to the UK.While the water demands were heavily pathway dependent this study finds for the thermal generation pathways there is a serious mismatch between the assumed freshwater available at 2030 and 2050, its expected actual availability, and an understanding of the implications this has for future generation costs. It is shown that a solution is to make greater use of the UK's seawater resource. This study finds the emphasis UK energy policy gives to the competing poles of low cost electricity generation and environmental protection will have significant impacts on the cost and make-up of the UK's future electricity generation portfolio. A companion paper will consider the generation cost issues if seawater is not available.

AB - The effects of increasing water and energy demand pose a growing threat to national infrastructure strategies. Within the UK there is concern that a future lack of water will compromise the UK's current energy policy to meet an increasing demand for electricity by more thermal generation. This paper investigates this by modelling the water demand of the UK's thermal generation in 2030 and 2050 for several future electricity generation pathways. Unlike previous studies this paper has obtained water abstraction and consumption figures specific to the UK.While the water demands were heavily pathway dependent this study finds for the thermal generation pathways there is a serious mismatch between the assumed freshwater available at 2030 and 2050, its expected actual availability, and an understanding of the implications this has for future generation costs. It is shown that a solution is to make greater use of the UK's seawater resource. This study finds the emphasis UK energy policy gives to the competing poles of low cost electricity generation and environmental protection will have significant impacts on the cost and make-up of the UK's future electricity generation portfolio. A companion paper will consider the generation cost issues if seawater is not available.

KW - Power station cooling

KW - Water-energy Nexus

KW - UK energy policy

KW - Water resources

KW - Climate Change

U2 - 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.05.011

DO - 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.05.011

M3 - Article

VL - 108

SP - 844

EP - 858

JO - Energy Policy

JF - Energy Policy

SN - 0301-4215

ER -