Ventricular volumes across stages of schizophrenia and other psychoses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

  • Gregor E Berger
  • Cali F Bartholomeusz
  • Anthony Ang
  • Lisa J Phillips
  • Tina Proffitt
  • Warrick J Brewer
  • Deidre Smith
  • Barnaby Nelson
  • Stefan J Borgwardt
  • Dennis Velakoulis
  • Alison R Yung
  • Patrick D McGorry
  • Christos Pantelis

Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, 35 Poplar rd, Parkville, VIC, Australia
  • Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne
  • Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Psychiatry Zurich, University of Zurich
  • Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne & Melbourne Health
  • Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne
  • The Melbourne Clinic, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne
  • Department of Psychiatry, University of Basel
  • University of Manchester
  • Greater Manchester West NHS Mental Health Foundation Trust

Abstract

Objective: Ventricular enlargement is common in established schizophrenia; however, data from ultra high-risk for psychosis and first-episode psychosis studies are inconclusive. This study aims to investigate ventricular volumes at different stages of psychosis. Methods: Ventricular volumes were measured using a semi-automated and highly reliable method, for 89 established schizophrenia, 162 first-episode psychosis, 135 ultra high-risk for psychosis and 87 healthy controls using 1.5T magnetic resonance images. Clinical outcome diagnoses for ultra high-risk for psychosis were evaluated at long-term follow-up (mean: 7.5years). Results: Compared to controls, we identified significant ventricular enlargement of 36.2% in established schizophrenia (p<0.001). Ventricular enlargement was not significant in first-episode psychosis (6%) or ultra high-risk for psychosis (−3%). Examination across stages of schizophrenia-spectrum diagnoses subgroups revealed a significant linear trend (p=0.006; established schizophrenia=36.2%, first-episode psychosis schizophrenia=18.5%, first-episode psychosis schizophreniform=−4.2% and ultra high-risk for psychosis-schizophrenia converters=−18.5%). Conclusion: Ventricular enlargement is apparent in patients with established schizophrenia but is not a feature at the earliest stages of illness (ultra high-risk for psychosis and first-episode psychosis). Further research is needed to fully characterize the nature and timing of ventricular volume changes early in the course of illness and how these changes impact outcomes.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1041-1051
JournalAustralian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume51
Issue number10
Early online date1 Jul 2017
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • ventricle , first-episode psychosis , ultra high-risk , diagnosis , neuroimaging