Using out-of-office blood pressure measurements in established cardiovascular risk scores: implications for practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Authors

  • S L Stevens
  • Richard J Stevens
  • PW de Leeuw
  • AA Kroon
  • P Gill
  • W J Verberk
  • Richard J. McManus

Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • University of Oxford

Abstract

Background: Blood pressure (BP) measurement is increasingly carried out through home or ambulatory monitoring, yet existing cardiovascular risk scores were developed for use with measurements obtained in clinic.

Aim: To describe differences in cardiovascular risk estimates obtained using ambulatory or home BP measurements instead of clinic readings.

Design and setting: Secondary analysis of data from adults aged 30-84 without prior history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in two BP monitoring studies (BP-Eth and HOMERUS).

Method: The primary comparison was Framingham risk calculated using BP measured as in the Framingham study or daytime ambulatory BP measurements. The QRISK2 and SCORE risk equations were also studied. Statistical and clinical significance were determined using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and scatter plots respectively.

Results: In 442 BP-Eth patients (mean age = 58 years, 50% female) the median absolute difference in 10-year Framingham cardiovascular risk calculated using BP measured as in the Framingham study or daytime ambulatory BP measurements was 1.84% (interquartile range 0.65 to 3.63, p=0.67). Only 31/ 442 (7.0%) of patients were reclassified across the 10% risk treatment threshold. In 165 HOMERUS patients (mean age = 56 years, 46% female) the median difference in 10-year risk was 2.76% (IQR 1.19 to 6.39, p<0.001) and only 8/165 (4.8%) of patient were reclassified.

Conclusion: Estimates of cardiovascular risk are similar when calculated using BP measurements obtained as in the risk score derivation study or through ambulatory monitoring. Further research is required to determine if differences in estimated risk would meaningfully influence risk score accuracy.Keywords: blood pressure, risk, myocardial infarction, stroke, primary health care

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e381-e388
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Volume69
Issue number683
Early online date30 May 2019
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Keywords

  • blood pressure, risk, myocardial infarction, stroke, primary health care