Using deliberative methods to establish a sufficient state of capability well-being for use in decision-making in the contexts of public health and social care

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@article{02abfede74764ed190e8eff6a9ae6ffd,
title = "Using deliberative methods to establish a sufficient state of capability well-being for use in decision-making in the contexts of public health and social care",
abstract = "Background:Health maximisation is unlikely to be a relevant objective for social care, where service users and the workforce have distinct priorities and needs. NICE permit use of a small number of capability-based measures for the evaluation of social care, including ICECAP-A, a measure with five attributes, each with four levels.Aim:To establish a sufficient state of capability well-being, as defined by ICECAP-A, through public deliberation, and evaluate and critically reflect on the deliberative process.Methods:A series of one-day/6.5 h citizens{\textquoteright} workshops were conducted, with recruitment from within purposively selected local authority areas. Workshops consisted of a mixture of background information, individual tasks, group discussion and voting.Representatives from each workshop were then invited to attend a {\textquoteleft}consensus workshop{\textquoteright}. Follow-up interviews facilitated evaluation of the deliberative process.Results:62 participants took part in deliberative work, across eight workshops. Participants actively engaged and provided positive feedback about their experience. Key considerations for participants included: the realistic ability of public services to enhance some areas of well-being; not removing incentives for self-help and avoiding state intrusion; building resilience and enabling people to {\textquoteleft}give back to society{\textquoteright}; ensuring that people are not left with a standard of well-being that is morally indefensible. The resulting sufficient state of capability well-being (defined by ICECAP-A) was 3,3,3,3,3 (where the best possible state is 4,4,4,4,4).Conclusion:Through a deliberative approach, representatives of the public were able to debate a complex social issue and reach a consensus decision on a sufficient state of capability well-being.",
keywords = "capability approach, sufficiency, decision-making, deliberation, social care, public health",
author = "Philip Kinghorn",
year = "2019",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112546",
language = "English",
volume = "240",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Social Science and Medicine",
issn = "0037-7856",
publisher = "Reed-Elsevier (India) Private Limited",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using deliberative methods to establish a sufficient state of capability well-being for use in decision-making in the contexts of public health and social care

AU - Kinghorn, Philip

PY - 2019/11/1

Y1 - 2019/11/1

N2 - Background:Health maximisation is unlikely to be a relevant objective for social care, where service users and the workforce have distinct priorities and needs. NICE permit use of a small number of capability-based measures for the evaluation of social care, including ICECAP-A, a measure with five attributes, each with four levels.Aim:To establish a sufficient state of capability well-being, as defined by ICECAP-A, through public deliberation, and evaluate and critically reflect on the deliberative process.Methods:A series of one-day/6.5 h citizens’ workshops were conducted, with recruitment from within purposively selected local authority areas. Workshops consisted of a mixture of background information, individual tasks, group discussion and voting.Representatives from each workshop were then invited to attend a ‘consensus workshop’. Follow-up interviews facilitated evaluation of the deliberative process.Results:62 participants took part in deliberative work, across eight workshops. Participants actively engaged and provided positive feedback about their experience. Key considerations for participants included: the realistic ability of public services to enhance some areas of well-being; not removing incentives for self-help and avoiding state intrusion; building resilience and enabling people to ‘give back to society’; ensuring that people are not left with a standard of well-being that is morally indefensible. The resulting sufficient state of capability well-being (defined by ICECAP-A) was 3,3,3,3,3 (where the best possible state is 4,4,4,4,4).Conclusion:Through a deliberative approach, representatives of the public were able to debate a complex social issue and reach a consensus decision on a sufficient state of capability well-being.

AB - Background:Health maximisation is unlikely to be a relevant objective for social care, where service users and the workforce have distinct priorities and needs. NICE permit use of a small number of capability-based measures for the evaluation of social care, including ICECAP-A, a measure with five attributes, each with four levels.Aim:To establish a sufficient state of capability well-being, as defined by ICECAP-A, through public deliberation, and evaluate and critically reflect on the deliberative process.Methods:A series of one-day/6.5 h citizens’ workshops were conducted, with recruitment from within purposively selected local authority areas. Workshops consisted of a mixture of background information, individual tasks, group discussion and voting.Representatives from each workshop were then invited to attend a ‘consensus workshop’. Follow-up interviews facilitated evaluation of the deliberative process.Results:62 participants took part in deliberative work, across eight workshops. Participants actively engaged and provided positive feedback about their experience. Key considerations for participants included: the realistic ability of public services to enhance some areas of well-being; not removing incentives for self-help and avoiding state intrusion; building resilience and enabling people to ‘give back to society’; ensuring that people are not left with a standard of well-being that is morally indefensible. The resulting sufficient state of capability well-being (defined by ICECAP-A) was 3,3,3,3,3 (where the best possible state is 4,4,4,4,4).Conclusion:Through a deliberative approach, representatives of the public were able to debate a complex social issue and reach a consensus decision on a sufficient state of capability well-being.

KW - capability approach

KW - sufficiency

KW - decision-making

KW - deliberation

KW - social care

KW - public health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072606361&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112546

DO - 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112546

M3 - Article

VL - 240

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Social Science and Medicine

JF - Social Science and Medicine

SN - 0037-7856

M1 - 112546

ER -