Type 2 diabetes, thiazolidinediones, and cardiovascular risk

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Type 2 diabetes, thiazolidinediones, and cardiovascular risk. / Taylor, Clare; Hobbs, Frederick.

In: British Journal of General Practice, Vol. 59, No. 564, 01.07.2009, p. 520-524.

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@article{cc3a0b844df94dcd81666e755e99fba0,
title = "Type 2 diabetes, thiazolidinediones, and cardiovascular risk",
abstract = "Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder with an increased risk of macrovascular complications. Achieving adequate glycaemic control is an important aim of therapy. Thiazolidinediones, or glitazones, have been used for the treatment of diabetes for a decade. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are currently available, however recent concerns around cardiovascular safety have led to restrictions on their use. Initial trials showed treatments with glitazones improved glycaemic control, however long-term outcomes such as cardiovascular events were not measured. Evidence from more recent trials suggests rosiglitazone is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and both glitazones are associated with higher rates of heart failure. This article discusses the evidence behind these concerns and the most recent guidance on use of thiazolidinediones in clinical practice.",
keywords = "glitazones, heart failure, thiazolidinediones, cardiovascular risk, type 2 diabetes",
author = "Clare Taylor and Frederick Hobbs",
year = "2009",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.3399/bjgp09X453440",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "520--524",
journal = "British Journal of General Practice ",
issn = "0960-1643",
publisher = "Royal College of General Practitioners",
number = "564",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Type 2 diabetes, thiazolidinediones, and cardiovascular risk

AU - Taylor, Clare

AU - Hobbs, Frederick

PY - 2009/7/1

Y1 - 2009/7/1

N2 - Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder with an increased risk of macrovascular complications. Achieving adequate glycaemic control is an important aim of therapy. Thiazolidinediones, or glitazones, have been used for the treatment of diabetes for a decade. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are currently available, however recent concerns around cardiovascular safety have led to restrictions on their use. Initial trials showed treatments with glitazones improved glycaemic control, however long-term outcomes such as cardiovascular events were not measured. Evidence from more recent trials suggests rosiglitazone is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and both glitazones are associated with higher rates of heart failure. This article discusses the evidence behind these concerns and the most recent guidance on use of thiazolidinediones in clinical practice.

AB - Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder with an increased risk of macrovascular complications. Achieving adequate glycaemic control is an important aim of therapy. Thiazolidinediones, or glitazones, have been used for the treatment of diabetes for a decade. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are currently available, however recent concerns around cardiovascular safety have led to restrictions on their use. Initial trials showed treatments with glitazones improved glycaemic control, however long-term outcomes such as cardiovascular events were not measured. Evidence from more recent trials suggests rosiglitazone is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and both glitazones are associated with higher rates of heart failure. This article discusses the evidence behind these concerns and the most recent guidance on use of thiazolidinediones in clinical practice.

KW - glitazones

KW - heart failure

KW - thiazolidinediones

KW - cardiovascular risk

KW - type 2 diabetes

U2 - 10.3399/bjgp09X453440

DO - 10.3399/bjgp09X453440

M3 - Article

C2 - 19567003

VL - 59

SP - 520

EP - 524

JO - British Journal of General Practice

JF - British Journal of General Practice

SN - 0960-1643

IS - 564

ER -