Time couse and mechanisms of hemoconcentration in response to mental stress

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Time couse and mechanisms of hemoconcentration in response to mental stress. / de Boer, Dolf; Ring, Christopher; Carroll, Douglas.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 72, 01.06.2006, p. 318-324.

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@article{ae37523f73f54b72bfa5c69b2b4d6c5a,
title = "Time couse and mechanisms of hemoconcentration in response to mental stress",
abstract = "Hemoconcentration with mental stress exposure may be involved in the triggering of acute cardiovascular events. In the present study, hematocrit was measured repeatedly at baseline, during a 4 min mental stress task and during 20 min of recovery. Blood was sampled every 1-2 min throughout. Blood pressure, heart rate and R-wave to pulse interval, a measure of cardiac contractility, were measured with the same periodicity. The stress task elicited a 1.3% increase in hematocrit, which was sustained with full return to baseline level occurring only after 16 min of recovery. Between-subject correlations between hematocrit and hemodynamic activity were low. Aggregate within-subject coefficients were more impressive; the temporal profile of hematocrit correlated significantly with all hemodynamic variables. Similar within-subject analyses indicated that whereas cardiac contractility was correlated with hematocrit both during stress-related increase and subsequent recovery, blood pressure was related to hematocrit only during the increase. This suggests that stress-induced hemoconcentration may driven by different mechanisms than those which underlie its recovery. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "mental stress, R-wave to pulse interval, heart rate, blood pressure, hematocrit, recovery, hemoconcentration",
author = "{de Boer}, Dolf and Christopher Ring and Douglas Carroll",
year = "2006",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.biopsycho.2005.12.004",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
pages = "318--324",
journal = "Biological Psychology",
issn = "0301-0511",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time couse and mechanisms of hemoconcentration in response to mental stress

AU - de Boer, Dolf

AU - Ring, Christopher

AU - Carroll, Douglas

PY - 2006/6/1

Y1 - 2006/6/1

N2 - Hemoconcentration with mental stress exposure may be involved in the triggering of acute cardiovascular events. In the present study, hematocrit was measured repeatedly at baseline, during a 4 min mental stress task and during 20 min of recovery. Blood was sampled every 1-2 min throughout. Blood pressure, heart rate and R-wave to pulse interval, a measure of cardiac contractility, were measured with the same periodicity. The stress task elicited a 1.3% increase in hematocrit, which was sustained with full return to baseline level occurring only after 16 min of recovery. Between-subject correlations between hematocrit and hemodynamic activity were low. Aggregate within-subject coefficients were more impressive; the temporal profile of hematocrit correlated significantly with all hemodynamic variables. Similar within-subject analyses indicated that whereas cardiac contractility was correlated with hematocrit both during stress-related increase and subsequent recovery, blood pressure was related to hematocrit only during the increase. This suggests that stress-induced hemoconcentration may driven by different mechanisms than those which underlie its recovery. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - Hemoconcentration with mental stress exposure may be involved in the triggering of acute cardiovascular events. In the present study, hematocrit was measured repeatedly at baseline, during a 4 min mental stress task and during 20 min of recovery. Blood was sampled every 1-2 min throughout. Blood pressure, heart rate and R-wave to pulse interval, a measure of cardiac contractility, were measured with the same periodicity. The stress task elicited a 1.3% increase in hematocrit, which was sustained with full return to baseline level occurring only after 16 min of recovery. Between-subject correlations between hematocrit and hemodynamic activity were low. Aggregate within-subject coefficients were more impressive; the temporal profile of hematocrit correlated significantly with all hemodynamic variables. Similar within-subject analyses indicated that whereas cardiac contractility was correlated with hematocrit both during stress-related increase and subsequent recovery, blood pressure was related to hematocrit only during the increase. This suggests that stress-induced hemoconcentration may driven by different mechanisms than those which underlie its recovery. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KW - mental stress

KW - R-wave to pulse interval

KW - heart rate

KW - blood pressure

KW - hematocrit

KW - recovery

KW - hemoconcentration

U2 - 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2005.12.004

DO - 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2005.12.004

M3 - Article

VL - 72

SP - 318

EP - 324

JO - Biological Psychology

JF - Biological Psychology

SN - 0301-0511

ER -