Time course and mechanisms of mental stress-induced changes and their recovery: hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, whole blood viscosity, coagulation times and hemodynamic activity

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@article{cc6344d3c9404b42be35ec047c096770,
title = "Time course and mechanisms of mental stress-induced changes and their recovery: hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, whole blood viscosity, coagulation times and hemodynamic activity",
abstract = "The mechanisms for stress-induced changes in hematocrit and blood viscosity are unclear. Twenty-two males completed experimental (30 min baseline, 10 min mental stress, 30 min recovery) and no-stress control conditions (70 min). Hemostatic and hemodynamic activity were measured throughout. Hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, and blood viscosity displayed parallel patterns: a progressive increase with stress, followed by a gradual recovery. Correlational and covariance analyses indicated that the increase in hematocrit may be mediated by arterial pressure whereas recovery may be mediated by colloid osmotic pressure. Analyses also indicated that acute changes in blood viscosity may depend on hematocrit. These data suggest that stress disturbs hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, and blood viscosity through arterial pressure. Poststress, elevated colloid osmotic pressure may drive its own recovery and that of hematocrit and blood viscosity.",
keywords = "mental stress, venous pressure, whole blood viscosity, hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, coagulation times",
author = "{de Boer}, Dolf and Christopher Ring and M Wood and C Ford and N Jessney and David McIntyre and Douglas Carroll",
year = "2007",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1469-8986.2007.00536.x",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "639--649",
journal = "Psychophysiology",
issn = "0048-5772",
publisher = "Wiley Online Library",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time course and mechanisms of mental stress-induced changes and their recovery: hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, whole blood viscosity, coagulation times and hemodynamic activity

AU - de Boer, Dolf

AU - Ring, Christopher

AU - Wood, M

AU - Ford, C

AU - Jessney, N

AU - McIntyre, David

AU - Carroll, Douglas

PY - 2007/7/1

Y1 - 2007/7/1

N2 - The mechanisms for stress-induced changes in hematocrit and blood viscosity are unclear. Twenty-two males completed experimental (30 min baseline, 10 min mental stress, 30 min recovery) and no-stress control conditions (70 min). Hemostatic and hemodynamic activity were measured throughout. Hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, and blood viscosity displayed parallel patterns: a progressive increase with stress, followed by a gradual recovery. Correlational and covariance analyses indicated that the increase in hematocrit may be mediated by arterial pressure whereas recovery may be mediated by colloid osmotic pressure. Analyses also indicated that acute changes in blood viscosity may depend on hematocrit. These data suggest that stress disturbs hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, and blood viscosity through arterial pressure. Poststress, elevated colloid osmotic pressure may drive its own recovery and that of hematocrit and blood viscosity.

AB - The mechanisms for stress-induced changes in hematocrit and blood viscosity are unclear. Twenty-two males completed experimental (30 min baseline, 10 min mental stress, 30 min recovery) and no-stress control conditions (70 min). Hemostatic and hemodynamic activity were measured throughout. Hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, and blood viscosity displayed parallel patterns: a progressive increase with stress, followed by a gradual recovery. Correlational and covariance analyses indicated that the increase in hematocrit may be mediated by arterial pressure whereas recovery may be mediated by colloid osmotic pressure. Analyses also indicated that acute changes in blood viscosity may depend on hematocrit. These data suggest that stress disturbs hematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure, and blood viscosity through arterial pressure. Poststress, elevated colloid osmotic pressure may drive its own recovery and that of hematocrit and blood viscosity.

KW - mental stress

KW - venous pressure

KW - whole blood viscosity

KW - hematocrit

KW - colloid osmotic pressure

KW - coagulation times

U2 - 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2007.00536.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1469-8986.2007.00536.x

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 639

EP - 649

JO - Psychophysiology

JF - Psychophysiology

SN - 0048-5772

ER -