The use of Facebook in social work practice with children and families: exploring complexity in an emerging practice

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The use of Facebook in social work practice with children and families : exploring complexity in an emerging practice. / Cooner, Tarsem Singh; Beddoe, Liz; Ferguson, Harry; Joy, Eileen.

In: Journal of Technology in Human Services, Vol. 38, No. 2, 22.10.2019, p. 137–158.

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@article{fe3a8249c1954a7ca890290c5cc9fd73,
title = "The use of Facebook in social work practice with children and families: exploring complexity in an emerging practice",
abstract = "This article draws from a 15-month participant observation study of social work and child protection practices in England to illustrate how social workers used Facebook to gain another view of service-users{\textquoteright} lives. Social media use was not an intended focus for the study, its presence emerged during our data analysis. While some research has shown that such practices occur, our long-term ethnographic approach provides new insights into how Facebook was actually used in ongoing casework with families and why it was used. Our findings show that Facebook use took multiple forms. Some social workers actively searched service users{\textquoteright} Facebook pages and some opposed any such usage. We further advance the literature by introducing a third group who were unwillingly “drawn into” acting on Facebook information presented to them by others such as their managers. Our research insights suggest that social work must pause to consider the implications of these complex emerging practices.",
keywords = "social work, Child Protection, social media, Facebook, ethics, ethnography, monitoring, surveillance",
author = "Cooner, {Tarsem Singh} and Liz Beddoe and Harry Ferguson and Eileen Joy",
year = "2019",
month = oct,
day = "22",
doi = "10.1080/15228835.2019.1680335",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "137–158",
journal = "Journal of Technology in Human Services",
issn = "1522-8835",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The use of Facebook in social work practice with children and families

T2 - exploring complexity in an emerging practice

AU - Cooner, Tarsem Singh

AU - Beddoe, Liz

AU - Ferguson, Harry

AU - Joy, Eileen

PY - 2019/10/22

Y1 - 2019/10/22

N2 - This article draws from a 15-month participant observation study of social work and child protection practices in England to illustrate how social workers used Facebook to gain another view of service-users’ lives. Social media use was not an intended focus for the study, its presence emerged during our data analysis. While some research has shown that such practices occur, our long-term ethnographic approach provides new insights into how Facebook was actually used in ongoing casework with families and why it was used. Our findings show that Facebook use took multiple forms. Some social workers actively searched service users’ Facebook pages and some opposed any such usage. We further advance the literature by introducing a third group who were unwillingly “drawn into” acting on Facebook information presented to them by others such as their managers. Our research insights suggest that social work must pause to consider the implications of these complex emerging practices.

AB - This article draws from a 15-month participant observation study of social work and child protection practices in England to illustrate how social workers used Facebook to gain another view of service-users’ lives. Social media use was not an intended focus for the study, its presence emerged during our data analysis. While some research has shown that such practices occur, our long-term ethnographic approach provides new insights into how Facebook was actually used in ongoing casework with families and why it was used. Our findings show that Facebook use took multiple forms. Some social workers actively searched service users’ Facebook pages and some opposed any such usage. We further advance the literature by introducing a third group who were unwillingly “drawn into” acting on Facebook information presented to them by others such as their managers. Our research insights suggest that social work must pause to consider the implications of these complex emerging practices.

KW - social work

KW - Child Protection

KW - social media

KW - Facebook

KW - ethics

KW - ethnography

KW - monitoring

KW - surveillance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076533850&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15228835.2019.1680335

DO - 10.1080/15228835.2019.1680335

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 137

EP - 158

JO - Journal of Technology in Human Services

JF - Journal of Technology in Human Services

SN - 1522-8835

IS - 2

ER -