The sound of soft alcohol: Crossmodal associations between interjections and liquor

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The sound of soft alcohol : Crossmodal associations between interjections and liquor. / Winter, Bodo; Pérez-Sobrino, Paula; Brown, Lucien.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 14, No. 8, e0220449, 08.08.2019.

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Winter, Bodo ; Pérez-Sobrino, Paula ; Brown, Lucien. / The sound of soft alcohol : Crossmodal associations between interjections and liquor. In: PLoS ONE. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 8.

Bibtex

@article{3bbfa884e08d44e1bd58013d6d615379,
title = "The sound of soft alcohol: Crossmodal associations between interjections and liquor",
abstract = "An increasing number of studies reveal crossmodal correspondences between speech sounds and perceptual features such as shape and size. In this study, we show that an interjection Koreans produce when downing a shot of liquor reliably triggers crossmodal associations in American English, German, Spanish, and Chinese listeners who do not speak Korean. Based on how this sound is used in advertising campaigns for the Korean liquor soju, we derive predictions for different crossmodal associations. Our experiments show that the same speech sound is reliably associated with various perceptual, affective, and social meanings. This demonstrates what we call the 'pluripotentiality' of iconicity, that is, the same speech sound is able to trigger a web of interrelated mental associations across different dimensions. We argue that the specific semantic associations evoked by iconic stimuli depend on the task, with iconic meanings having a 'latent' quality that becomes 'actual' in specific semantic contexts. We outline implications for theories of iconicity and advertising.",
author = "Bodo Winter and Paula P{\'e}rez-Sobrino and Lucien Brown",
year = "2019",
month = aug,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0220449",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "PLoSONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science (PLOS)",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The sound of soft alcohol

T2 - Crossmodal associations between interjections and liquor

AU - Winter, Bodo

AU - Pérez-Sobrino, Paula

AU - Brown, Lucien

PY - 2019/8/8

Y1 - 2019/8/8

N2 - An increasing number of studies reveal crossmodal correspondences between speech sounds and perceptual features such as shape and size. In this study, we show that an interjection Koreans produce when downing a shot of liquor reliably triggers crossmodal associations in American English, German, Spanish, and Chinese listeners who do not speak Korean. Based on how this sound is used in advertising campaigns for the Korean liquor soju, we derive predictions for different crossmodal associations. Our experiments show that the same speech sound is reliably associated with various perceptual, affective, and social meanings. This demonstrates what we call the 'pluripotentiality' of iconicity, that is, the same speech sound is able to trigger a web of interrelated mental associations across different dimensions. We argue that the specific semantic associations evoked by iconic stimuli depend on the task, with iconic meanings having a 'latent' quality that becomes 'actual' in specific semantic contexts. We outline implications for theories of iconicity and advertising.

AB - An increasing number of studies reveal crossmodal correspondences between speech sounds and perceptual features such as shape and size. In this study, we show that an interjection Koreans produce when downing a shot of liquor reliably triggers crossmodal associations in American English, German, Spanish, and Chinese listeners who do not speak Korean. Based on how this sound is used in advertising campaigns for the Korean liquor soju, we derive predictions for different crossmodal associations. Our experiments show that the same speech sound is reliably associated with various perceptual, affective, and social meanings. This demonstrates what we call the 'pluripotentiality' of iconicity, that is, the same speech sound is able to trigger a web of interrelated mental associations across different dimensions. We argue that the specific semantic associations evoked by iconic stimuli depend on the task, with iconic meanings having a 'latent' quality that becomes 'actual' in specific semantic contexts. We outline implications for theories of iconicity and advertising.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0220449

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0220449

M3 - Article

C2 - 31393912

VL - 14

JO - PLoSONE

JF - PLoSONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 8

M1 - e0220449

ER -