The Role of Vitamin D in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mechanism to Management

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The Role of Vitamin D in Inflammatory Bowel Disease : Mechanism to Management. / Fletcher, Jane; Cooper, Sheldon C; Ghosh, Subrata; Hewison, Martin.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 5, 1019, 07.05.2019.

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@article{148bf8949b7248ca8711de5e5d51f63a,
title = "The Role of Vitamin D in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mechanism to Management",
abstract = "Vitamin D has been linked to human health benefits that extend far beyond its established actions on calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. One of the most well studied facets of extra-skeletal vitamin D is its activity as an immuno-modulator, in particular its potent anti-inflammatory effects. As a consequence, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Low serum levels of the major circulating form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D) are significantly more prevalent in patients with IBD, particularly in the winter and spring months when UV-induced synthesis of vitamin D is lower. Dietary malabsorption of vitamin D may also contribute to low serum 25(OH)D in IBD. The benefits of supplementation with vitamin D for IBD patients are still unclear, and improved vitamin D status may help to prevent the onset of IBD as well as ameliorating disease severity. Beneficial effects of vitamin D in IBD are supported by pre-clinical studies, notably with mouse models, where the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) has been shown to regulate gastrointestinal microbiota function, and promote anti-inflammatory, tolerogenic immune responses. The current narrative review aims to summarise the different strands of data linking vitamin D and IBD, whilst also outlining the possible beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in managing IBD in humans.",
keywords = "Crohn{\textquoteright}s disease, Deficiency, IBD, Supplementation, Ulcerative colitis, Vitamin D",
author = "Jane Fletcher and Cooper, {Sheldon C} and Subrata Ghosh and Martin Hewison",
year = "2019",
month = may,
day = "7",
doi = "10.3390/nu11051019",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Role of Vitamin D in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

T2 - Mechanism to Management

AU - Fletcher, Jane

AU - Cooper, Sheldon C

AU - Ghosh, Subrata

AU - Hewison, Martin

PY - 2019/5/7

Y1 - 2019/5/7

N2 - Vitamin D has been linked to human health benefits that extend far beyond its established actions on calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. One of the most well studied facets of extra-skeletal vitamin D is its activity as an immuno-modulator, in particular its potent anti-inflammatory effects. As a consequence, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Low serum levels of the major circulating form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D) are significantly more prevalent in patients with IBD, particularly in the winter and spring months when UV-induced synthesis of vitamin D is lower. Dietary malabsorption of vitamin D may also contribute to low serum 25(OH)D in IBD. The benefits of supplementation with vitamin D for IBD patients are still unclear, and improved vitamin D status may help to prevent the onset of IBD as well as ameliorating disease severity. Beneficial effects of vitamin D in IBD are supported by pre-clinical studies, notably with mouse models, where the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) has been shown to regulate gastrointestinal microbiota function, and promote anti-inflammatory, tolerogenic immune responses. The current narrative review aims to summarise the different strands of data linking vitamin D and IBD, whilst also outlining the possible beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in managing IBD in humans.

AB - Vitamin D has been linked to human health benefits that extend far beyond its established actions on calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. One of the most well studied facets of extra-skeletal vitamin D is its activity as an immuno-modulator, in particular its potent anti-inflammatory effects. As a consequence, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Low serum levels of the major circulating form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D) are significantly more prevalent in patients with IBD, particularly in the winter and spring months when UV-induced synthesis of vitamin D is lower. Dietary malabsorption of vitamin D may also contribute to low serum 25(OH)D in IBD. The benefits of supplementation with vitamin D for IBD patients are still unclear, and improved vitamin D status may help to prevent the onset of IBD as well as ameliorating disease severity. Beneficial effects of vitamin D in IBD are supported by pre-clinical studies, notably with mouse models, where the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) has been shown to regulate gastrointestinal microbiota function, and promote anti-inflammatory, tolerogenic immune responses. The current narrative review aims to summarise the different strands of data linking vitamin D and IBD, whilst also outlining the possible beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in managing IBD in humans.

KW - Crohn’s disease

KW - Deficiency

KW - IBD

KW - Supplementation

KW - Ulcerative colitis

KW - Vitamin D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065802721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/nu11051019

DO - 10.3390/nu11051019

M3 - Article

C2 - 31067701

VL - 11

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 5

M1 - 1019

ER -