The role of semantic transparency in the processing of English Compound Words

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The role of semantic transparency in the processing of English Compound Words. / Frisson, Steven; Niswander-Klement, E; Pollatsek, A.

In: British Journal of Psychology, Vol. in press, 01.02.2008, p. 87-107.

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Frisson, Steven ; Niswander-Klement, E ; Pollatsek, A. / The role of semantic transparency in the processing of English Compound Words. In: British Journal of Psychology. 2008 ; Vol. in press. pp. 87-107.

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@article{ee6bf987d93c43a98811d8e1e82bad2f,
title = "The role of semantic transparency in the processing of English Compound Words",
abstract = "Experiment 1 examined whether the semantic transparency of an English unspaced compound word affected how long it took to process it in reading. Three types of opaque words were each compared with a matched set of transparent words (i.e. matched on the length and frequency of the constituents and the frequency of the word as a whole). Two sets of the opaque words were partially opaque: either the first constituent was not related to the meaning of the compound (opaque-transparent) or the second constituent was not related to the meaning of the compound (transparent-opaque). In the third set (opaque-opaque), neither constituent was related to the meaning of the compound. For all three sets, there was no significant difference between the opaque and the transparent words on any eye-movement measure. This replicates an earlier finding with Finnish compound words (Pollatsek & Hy{\"o}n{\"a}, 2005) and indicates that, although there is now abundant evidence that the component constituents play a role in the encoding of compound words, the meaning of the compound word is not constructed from the parts, at least for compound words for which a lexical entry exists. Experiment 2 used the same compounds but with a space between the constituents. This presentation resulted in a transparency effect, indicating that when an assembly route is 'forced', transparency does play a role.",
author = "Steven Frisson and E Niswander-Klement and A Pollatsek",
year = "2008",
month = feb,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1348/000712607X181304",
language = "English",
volume = "in press",
pages = "87--107",
journal = "British Journal of Psychology",
issn = "0007-1269",
publisher = "Wiley",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of semantic transparency in the processing of English Compound Words

AU - Frisson, Steven

AU - Niswander-Klement, E

AU - Pollatsek, A

PY - 2008/2/1

Y1 - 2008/2/1

N2 - Experiment 1 examined whether the semantic transparency of an English unspaced compound word affected how long it took to process it in reading. Three types of opaque words were each compared with a matched set of transparent words (i.e. matched on the length and frequency of the constituents and the frequency of the word as a whole). Two sets of the opaque words were partially opaque: either the first constituent was not related to the meaning of the compound (opaque-transparent) or the second constituent was not related to the meaning of the compound (transparent-opaque). In the third set (opaque-opaque), neither constituent was related to the meaning of the compound. For all three sets, there was no significant difference between the opaque and the transparent words on any eye-movement measure. This replicates an earlier finding with Finnish compound words (Pollatsek & Hyönä, 2005) and indicates that, although there is now abundant evidence that the component constituents play a role in the encoding of compound words, the meaning of the compound word is not constructed from the parts, at least for compound words for which a lexical entry exists. Experiment 2 used the same compounds but with a space between the constituents. This presentation resulted in a transparency effect, indicating that when an assembly route is 'forced', transparency does play a role.

AB - Experiment 1 examined whether the semantic transparency of an English unspaced compound word affected how long it took to process it in reading. Three types of opaque words were each compared with a matched set of transparent words (i.e. matched on the length and frequency of the constituents and the frequency of the word as a whole). Two sets of the opaque words were partially opaque: either the first constituent was not related to the meaning of the compound (opaque-transparent) or the second constituent was not related to the meaning of the compound (transparent-opaque). In the third set (opaque-opaque), neither constituent was related to the meaning of the compound. For all three sets, there was no significant difference between the opaque and the transparent words on any eye-movement measure. This replicates an earlier finding with Finnish compound words (Pollatsek & Hyönä, 2005) and indicates that, although there is now abundant evidence that the component constituents play a role in the encoding of compound words, the meaning of the compound word is not constructed from the parts, at least for compound words for which a lexical entry exists. Experiment 2 used the same compounds but with a space between the constituents. This presentation resulted in a transparency effect, indicating that when an assembly route is 'forced', transparency does play a role.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=39449092617&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1348/000712607X181304

DO - 10.1348/000712607X181304

M3 - Article

C2 - 17535465

VL - in press

SP - 87

EP - 107

JO - British Journal of Psychology

JF - British Journal of Psychology

SN - 0007-1269

ER -