The ‘powerless parliament’? Agenda-setting and the role of the UK parliament in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008

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@article{cc1051150a9e4b74aea16b8fb1d9ba70,
title = "The {\textquoteleft}powerless parliament{\textquoteright}? Agenda-setting and the role of the UK parliament in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008",
abstract = "This article uses a case study of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act2008 to examine the legislative role of the UK Parliament. Parliament is often considered to be a weak legislative actor, although this view has increasingly been challenged by legislative scholars. In this case, Parliament exercised agenda-setting powers at the pre-legislative stage that produced a significant impact on legislative outcomes. The article demonstrates the value for legislative studies of disaggregating the legislative timeframe and thereby examining the power of legislatures beyond the formal decision-making process. It alsoidentifies a set of enabling conditions – for example, extended pre-legislative scrutiny, low political salience, and synchronisation of committee timelines with the legislative process – under which legislatures might exercise agenda-setting power in other areas of policy. The case study finds that those parliamentarians who engaged with policy in the agenda-setting phase exerted greater influence over policy outcomes than those who engaged at the decision-makingstage",
keywords = "Agenda setting, Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act, Parliament, Power, Morality Policy",
author = "Stephen Bates and Mark Goodwin",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
day = "20",
doi = "10.1057/bp.2015.37",
language = "English",
journal = "British Politics",
issn = "1746-918X",
publisher = "Palgrave Macmillan",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The ‘powerless parliament’? Agenda-setting and the role of the UK parliament in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008

AU - Bates, Stephen

AU - Goodwin, Mark

PY - 2015/7/20

Y1 - 2015/7/20

N2 - This article uses a case study of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act2008 to examine the legislative role of the UK Parliament. Parliament is often considered to be a weak legislative actor, although this view has increasingly been challenged by legislative scholars. In this case, Parliament exercised agenda-setting powers at the pre-legislative stage that produced a significant impact on legislative outcomes. The article demonstrates the value for legislative studies of disaggregating the legislative timeframe and thereby examining the power of legislatures beyond the formal decision-making process. It alsoidentifies a set of enabling conditions – for example, extended pre-legislative scrutiny, low political salience, and synchronisation of committee timelines with the legislative process – under which legislatures might exercise agenda-setting power in other areas of policy. The case study finds that those parliamentarians who engaged with policy in the agenda-setting phase exerted greater influence over policy outcomes than those who engaged at the decision-makingstage

AB - This article uses a case study of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act2008 to examine the legislative role of the UK Parliament. Parliament is often considered to be a weak legislative actor, although this view has increasingly been challenged by legislative scholars. In this case, Parliament exercised agenda-setting powers at the pre-legislative stage that produced a significant impact on legislative outcomes. The article demonstrates the value for legislative studies of disaggregating the legislative timeframe and thereby examining the power of legislatures beyond the formal decision-making process. It alsoidentifies a set of enabling conditions – for example, extended pre-legislative scrutiny, low political salience, and synchronisation of committee timelines with the legislative process – under which legislatures might exercise agenda-setting power in other areas of policy. The case study finds that those parliamentarians who engaged with policy in the agenda-setting phase exerted greater influence over policy outcomes than those who engaged at the decision-makingstage

KW - Agenda setting

KW - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act

KW - Parliament

KW - Power

KW - Morality Policy

U2 - 10.1057/bp.2015.37

DO - 10.1057/bp.2015.37

M3 - Article

JO - British Politics

JF - British Politics

SN - 1746-918X

ER -