The persistence of self-injurious and aggressive behavior in males with fragile X syndrome over 8 years: a longitudinal study of prevalence and predictive risk markers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

  • Hayley Crawford
  • Efthalia Karakatsani
  • Gursharan Singla
  • Chris Oliver

Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • Centre for Innovative Research Across the Life Course, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
  • Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, 52 Pritchatts Road, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK.
  • Department of Psychology, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.
  • Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, 52 Pritchatts Road, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. c.oliver@bham.ac.uk.

Abstract

Self-injurious and aggressive behaviors are common in fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, little is known about the persistence of these behaviors and associated risk markers. We established the prevalence and persistence of self-injurious and aggressive behaviors over eight years in males with FXS, and associations with risk markers. Results showed 77% and 69% persistence rates for self-injurious and aggressive behavior, respectively. Baseline levels of repetitive behavior predicted persistent self-injurious behavior. Chronological age, impulsivity and overactivity were associated with persistent aggressive behavior but only impulsivity predicted persistence. This is the first study to document the persistence of self-injurious and aggressive behavior in FXS over the medium to long term and to identify behavioral risk markers that might facilitate targeted early intervention.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Early online date24 Apr 2019
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • Aggression, Autism, Challenging behavior, Early intervention, Fragile X syndrome, Impulsivity, Repetitive behavior, Risk markers, Self-injurious behavior