The persistence of self-injurious and aggressive behavior in males with fragile X syndrome over 8 years: a longitudinal study of prevalence and predictive risk markers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

  • Hayley Crawford
  • Efthalia Karakatsani
  • Gursharan Singla
  • Chris Oliver

Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • Centre for Innovative Research Across the Life Course, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
  • Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, 52 Pritchatts Road, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK.
  • Department of Psychology, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.
  • Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, 52 Pritchatts Road, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. c.oliver@bham.ac.uk.

Abstract

Self-injurious and aggressive behaviors are common in fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, little is known about the persistence of these behaviors and associated risk markers. We established the prevalence and persistence of self-injurious and aggressive behaviors over eight years in males with FXS, and associations with risk markers. Results showed 77% and 69% persistence rates for self-injurious and aggressive behavior, respectively. Baseline levels of repetitive behavior predicted persistent self-injurious behavior. Chronological age, impulsivity and overactivity were associated with persistent aggressive behavior but only impulsivity predicted persistence. This is the first study to document the persistence of self-injurious and aggressive behavior in FXS over the medium to long term and to identify behavioral risk markers that might facilitate targeted early intervention.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2913-2922
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume49
Issue number7
Early online date24 Apr 2019
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jul 2019

Keywords

  • Aggression, Autism, Challenging behavior, Early intervention, Fragile X syndrome, Impulsivity, Repetitive behavior, Risk markers, Self-injurious behavior