The new youth sector assemblage: reforming youth provision through a finance capital imaginary

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The new youth sector assemblage : reforming youth provision through a finance capital imaginary. / McGimpsey, Ian.

In: Journal of Education Policy, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2018, p. 226-242.

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@article{b73afe95b3134dd19c0f0378248228a4,
title = "The new youth sector assemblage: reforming youth provision through a finance capital imaginary",
abstract = "The language of austerity has been widely used to characterize policy-making in post-industrial nations since the financial crisis. Youth services in England are a noted example of the effects of austerity, having suffered rapid and severe cuts following a period of record investment prior to 2008. In this article, I argue that {\textquoteleft}austerity{\textquoteright} is an inadequate conceptual basis for critical analysis of policy-making since 2008, and that youth services are better understood as an exemplar case of the reforming effects of a {\textquoteleft}late neoliberal regime{\textquoteright}. The late neoliberal regime describes a regulation of production through a finance capital imaginary, as distinct from the productive capital imaginary of the quasi-marketising neoliberal regime. I argue that late neoliberalism has effected the disassembly of quasi-marketised youth services and simultaneously the emergence of a new youth sector founded on norms of investment and return. I trace the reforming force of this regime through the productive relations of capital distributions, policy discourse, and organizational forms.",
keywords = "neoliberalism, youth services, assemblage, social investment, austerity ",
author = "Ian McGimpsey",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/02680939.2017.1361551",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "226--242",
journal = "Journal of Education Policy",
issn = "0268-0939",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The new youth sector assemblage

T2 - reforming youth provision through a finance capital imaginary

AU - McGimpsey, Ian

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The language of austerity has been widely used to characterize policy-making in post-industrial nations since the financial crisis. Youth services in England are a noted example of the effects of austerity, having suffered rapid and severe cuts following a period of record investment prior to 2008. In this article, I argue that ‘austerity’ is an inadequate conceptual basis for critical analysis of policy-making since 2008, and that youth services are better understood as an exemplar case of the reforming effects of a ‘late neoliberal regime’. The late neoliberal regime describes a regulation of production through a finance capital imaginary, as distinct from the productive capital imaginary of the quasi-marketising neoliberal regime. I argue that late neoliberalism has effected the disassembly of quasi-marketised youth services and simultaneously the emergence of a new youth sector founded on norms of investment and return. I trace the reforming force of this regime through the productive relations of capital distributions, policy discourse, and organizational forms.

AB - The language of austerity has been widely used to characterize policy-making in post-industrial nations since the financial crisis. Youth services in England are a noted example of the effects of austerity, having suffered rapid and severe cuts following a period of record investment prior to 2008. In this article, I argue that ‘austerity’ is an inadequate conceptual basis for critical analysis of policy-making since 2008, and that youth services are better understood as an exemplar case of the reforming effects of a ‘late neoliberal regime’. The late neoliberal regime describes a regulation of production through a finance capital imaginary, as distinct from the productive capital imaginary of the quasi-marketising neoliberal regime. I argue that late neoliberalism has effected the disassembly of quasi-marketised youth services and simultaneously the emergence of a new youth sector founded on norms of investment and return. I trace the reforming force of this regime through the productive relations of capital distributions, policy discourse, and organizational forms.

KW - neoliberalism

KW - youth services

KW - assemblage

KW - social investment

KW - austerity

U2 - 10.1080/02680939.2017.1361551

DO - 10.1080/02680939.2017.1361551

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 226

EP - 242

JO - Journal of Education Policy

JF - Journal of Education Policy

SN - 0268-0939

IS - 2

ER -