The nature and correlates of paid and unpaid work among service users of London Community Mental Health Teams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

The nature and correlates of paid and unpaid work among service users of London Community Mental Health Teams. / Lloyd-Evans, B.; Marwaha, S.; Burns, T.; Secker, J.; Latimer, E.; Blizard, R.; Killaspy, H.; Totman, J.; Tanskanen, S.; Johnson, S.

In: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.06.2013, p. 169-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Lloyd-Evans, B, Marwaha, S, Burns, T, Secker, J, Latimer, E, Blizard, R, Killaspy, H, Totman, J, Tanskanen, S & Johnson, S 2013, 'The nature and correlates of paid and unpaid work among service users of London Community Mental Health Teams', Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 169-180. https://doi.org/10.1017/S2045796012000534

APA

Lloyd-Evans, B., Marwaha, S., Burns, T., Secker, J., Latimer, E., Blizard, R., Killaspy, H., Totman, J., Tanskanen, S., & Johnson, S. (2013). The nature and correlates of paid and unpaid work among service users of London Community Mental Health Teams. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, 22(2), 169-180. https://doi.org/10.1017/S2045796012000534

Vancouver

Author

Lloyd-Evans, B. ; Marwaha, S. ; Burns, T. ; Secker, J. ; Latimer, E. ; Blizard, R. ; Killaspy, H. ; Totman, J. ; Tanskanen, S. ; Johnson, S. / The nature and correlates of paid and unpaid work among service users of London Community Mental Health Teams. In: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences. 2013 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 169-180.

Bibtex

@article{3c72d79064c741518ec79f5d7922ca40,
title = "The nature and correlates of paid and unpaid work among service users of London Community Mental Health Teams",
abstract = "Aims. Little is known about how the rates and characteristics of mental health service users in unpaid work, training and study compare with those in paid employment. Methods. From staff report and patient records, 1353 mental health service users of seven Community Mental Health Teams in two London boroughs were categorized as in paid work, unpaid vocational activity or no vocational activity. Types of work were described using Standard Occupational Classifications. The characteristics of each group were reported and associations with vocational status were explored. Results. Of the sample, 5.5% were in paid work and 12.7% were in unpaid vocational activity, (including 5.3% in voluntary work and 8.1% in study or training). People in paid work were engaged in a broader range of occupations than those in voluntary work and most in paid work (58.5%) worked part-time. Younger age and high educational attainment characterized both groups. Having sustained previous employment was most strongly associated with being in paid work. Conclusions. Rates of vocational activity were very low. Results did not suggest a clear clinical distinction between those in paid and unpaid activity. The motivations for and functions of unpaid work need further research.",
keywords = "Cross-sectional study, employment, mental health, voluntary work",
author = "B. Lloyd-Evans and S. Marwaha and T. Burns and J. Secker and E. Latimer and R. Blizard and H. Killaspy and J. Totman and S. Tanskanen and S. Johnson",
year = "2013",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S2045796012000534",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "169--180",
journal = "Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences",
issn = "2045-7960",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The nature and correlates of paid and unpaid work among service users of London Community Mental Health Teams

AU - Lloyd-Evans, B.

AU - Marwaha, S.

AU - Burns, T.

AU - Secker, J.

AU - Latimer, E.

AU - Blizard, R.

AU - Killaspy, H.

AU - Totman, J.

AU - Tanskanen, S.

AU - Johnson, S.

PY - 2013/6/1

Y1 - 2013/6/1

N2 - Aims. Little is known about how the rates and characteristics of mental health service users in unpaid work, training and study compare with those in paid employment. Methods. From staff report and patient records, 1353 mental health service users of seven Community Mental Health Teams in two London boroughs were categorized as in paid work, unpaid vocational activity or no vocational activity. Types of work were described using Standard Occupational Classifications. The characteristics of each group were reported and associations with vocational status were explored. Results. Of the sample, 5.5% were in paid work and 12.7% were in unpaid vocational activity, (including 5.3% in voluntary work and 8.1% in study or training). People in paid work were engaged in a broader range of occupations than those in voluntary work and most in paid work (58.5%) worked part-time. Younger age and high educational attainment characterized both groups. Having sustained previous employment was most strongly associated with being in paid work. Conclusions. Rates of vocational activity were very low. Results did not suggest a clear clinical distinction between those in paid and unpaid activity. The motivations for and functions of unpaid work need further research.

AB - Aims. Little is known about how the rates and characteristics of mental health service users in unpaid work, training and study compare with those in paid employment. Methods. From staff report and patient records, 1353 mental health service users of seven Community Mental Health Teams in two London boroughs were categorized as in paid work, unpaid vocational activity or no vocational activity. Types of work were described using Standard Occupational Classifications. The characteristics of each group were reported and associations with vocational status were explored. Results. Of the sample, 5.5% were in paid work and 12.7% were in unpaid vocational activity, (including 5.3% in voluntary work and 8.1% in study or training). People in paid work were engaged in a broader range of occupations than those in voluntary work and most in paid work (58.5%) worked part-time. Younger age and high educational attainment characterized both groups. Having sustained previous employment was most strongly associated with being in paid work. Conclusions. Rates of vocational activity were very low. Results did not suggest a clear clinical distinction between those in paid and unpaid activity. The motivations for and functions of unpaid work need further research.

KW - Cross-sectional study

KW - employment

KW - mental health

KW - voluntary work

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84877727446&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S2045796012000534

DO - 10.1017/S2045796012000534

M3 - Article

C2 - 23089160

AN - SCOPUS:84877727446

VL - 22

SP - 169

EP - 180

JO - Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences

JF - Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences

SN - 2045-7960

IS - 2

ER -