The middle cerebral artery blood velocity response to acute normobaric hypoxia occurs independently of changes in ventilation in humans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Authors

  • Sultan E AlSalahi
  • Rehan T Junejo
  • Christopher Bradley
  • Christoph Siebenmann
  • James P Fisher

Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • Institute of Mountain Emergency Medicine
  • Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; and Centre for Brain Research, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Does the ventilatory response to moderate acute hypoxia increase cerebral perfusion independently of changes in arterial oxygen tension in humans? What is the main finding and its importance? The ventilatory response does not increase middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity during moderate isocapnic acute hypoxia beyond that elicited by reduced oxygen saturation. Abstract: Hypoxia induces ventilatory, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular adjustments to defend against reductions in systemic oxygen delivery. We aimed to determine whether the ventilatory response to moderate acute hypoxia increases cerebral perfusion independently of changes in arterial oxygenation. Eleven young healthy individuals were exposed to four 15 min experimental conditions: (1) normoxia (partial pressure of end-tidal oxygen, (Formula presented.) = 100 mmHg), (2) hypoxia ((Formula presented.) = 50 mmHg), (3) normoxia with breathing volitionally matched to levels observed during hypoxia (hyperpnoea; (Formula presented.) = 100 mmHg) and (4) hypoxia ((Formula presented.) = 50 mmHg) with respiratory frequency and tidal volume volitionally matched to levels observed during normoxia (i.e., restricted breathing (RB)). Isocapnia was maintained in all conditions. Middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V mean), assessed by transcranial Doppler ultrasound, was increased during hypoxia (58 ± 12 cm/s, P = 0.04) and hypoxia + RB (61 ± 14 cm/s, P < 0.001) compared to normoxia (55 ± 11 cm/s), while it was unchanged during hyperpnoea (52 ± 13 cm/s, P = 0.08). MCA V mean was not different between hypoxia and hypoxia + RB (P > 0.05). These findings suggest that the hypoxic ventilatory response does not increase cerebral perfusion, indexed using MCA V mean, during moderate isocapnic acute hypoxia beyond that elicited by reduced oxygen saturation.

Details

Original languageEnglish
JournalExperimental Physiology
Early online date1 Feb 2021
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • blood flow, brain, heart rate, ventilation