The influence of ingroup/outgroup categorization on same- and other-race face processing: The moderating role of inter- versus intra-racial context

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@article{8fe394c51f1d48289c309013b89da956,
title = "The influence of ingroup/outgroup categorization on same- and other-race face processing: The moderating role of inter- versus intra-racial context",
abstract = "We investigated the impact of ingroup/outgroup categorization on the encoding of same-race and other-race faces presented in inter-racial and intra-racial contexts (Experiments 1 and 2, respectively). White participants performed a same/different matching task on pairs of upright and inverted faces that were either same-race (White) or other-race (Black), and labeled as being from the same university or a different university. In Experiment 1, the same- and other-race faces were intermixed. For other-race faces, participants demonstrated greater configural processing following same- than other-university labeling. Same-race faces showed strong configural coding irrespective of the university labeling. In Experiment 2, faces were blocked by race. Participants demonstrated greater configural processing of same- than other-university faces, but now for both same- and other-race faces. These results demonstrate that other-race face processing is sensitive to non-racial ingroup/outgroup status regardless of racial context, but that the sensitivity of same-race face processing to the same cues depends on the racial context in which targets are encountered. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Racial context, Inversion effects, Face processing, Configural processing, Ingroup/outgroup categorization, Other-race effect",
author = "Kevin Cassidy and Kimberly Quinn and Glyn Humphreys",
year = "2011",
month = jul
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jesp.2011.02.017",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "811--817",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Social Psychology",
issn = "0022-1031",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of ingroup/outgroup categorization on same- and other-race face processing: The moderating role of inter- versus intra-racial context

AU - Cassidy, Kevin

AU - Quinn, Kimberly

AU - Humphreys, Glyn

PY - 2011/7/1

Y1 - 2011/7/1

N2 - We investigated the impact of ingroup/outgroup categorization on the encoding of same-race and other-race faces presented in inter-racial and intra-racial contexts (Experiments 1 and 2, respectively). White participants performed a same/different matching task on pairs of upright and inverted faces that were either same-race (White) or other-race (Black), and labeled as being from the same university or a different university. In Experiment 1, the same- and other-race faces were intermixed. For other-race faces, participants demonstrated greater configural processing following same- than other-university labeling. Same-race faces showed strong configural coding irrespective of the university labeling. In Experiment 2, faces were blocked by race. Participants demonstrated greater configural processing of same- than other-university faces, but now for both same- and other-race faces. These results demonstrate that other-race face processing is sensitive to non-racial ingroup/outgroup status regardless of racial context, but that the sensitivity of same-race face processing to the same cues depends on the racial context in which targets are encountered. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - We investigated the impact of ingroup/outgroup categorization on the encoding of same-race and other-race faces presented in inter-racial and intra-racial contexts (Experiments 1 and 2, respectively). White participants performed a same/different matching task on pairs of upright and inverted faces that were either same-race (White) or other-race (Black), and labeled as being from the same university or a different university. In Experiment 1, the same- and other-race faces were intermixed. For other-race faces, participants demonstrated greater configural processing following same- than other-university labeling. Same-race faces showed strong configural coding irrespective of the university labeling. In Experiment 2, faces were blocked by race. Participants demonstrated greater configural processing of same- than other-university faces, but now for both same- and other-race faces. These results demonstrate that other-race face processing is sensitive to non-racial ingroup/outgroup status regardless of racial context, but that the sensitivity of same-race face processing to the same cues depends on the racial context in which targets are encountered. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - Racial context

KW - Inversion effects

KW - Face processing

KW - Configural processing

KW - Ingroup/outgroup categorization

KW - Other-race effect

U2 - 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.02.017

DO - 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.02.017

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 811

EP - 817

JO - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

JF - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

SN - 0022-1031

IS - 4

ER -