The impact of neuropsychological functioning and coping style on perceived stress in individuals with first-episode psychosis and healthy controls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

  • Kelly A. Allott
  • Marta Rapado-Castro
  • Tina-marie Proffitt
  • Sarah Bendall
  • Belinda Garner
  • Felicity Butselaar
  • Connie Markulev
  • Christina Phassouliotis
  • Patrick D. Mcgorry
  • Susan M. Cotton
  • Lisa J. Phillips

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

Stress is implicated in the development and course of psychotic illness, but the factors that influence stress levels are not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of neuropsychological functioning and coping styles on perceived stress in people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and healthy controls (HC). Thirty-four minimally treated FEP patients from the Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre, Melbourne, Australia, and 26 HC participants from a similar demographic area participated in the study. Participants completed a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery as well as the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (task-, emotion- and avoidance-focussed coping styles) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Linear regressions were used to determine the contribution of neuropsychological functioning and coping style to perceived stress in the two groups. In the FEP group, higher levels of emotion-focussed and lower levels of task-focussed coping were associated with elevated stress. Higher premorbid IQ and working memory were also associated with higher subjective stress. In the HC group, higher levels of emotion-focussed coping, and contrary to the FEP group, lower premorbid IQ, working memory and executive functioning, were associated with increased stress. Lower intellectual functioning may provide some protection against perceived stress in FEP.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-35
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume226
Issue number1
Early online date30 Dec 2014
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Dec 2014