The impact of high-intensity intermittent exercise on resting metabolic rate in healthy males

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The impact of high-intensity intermittent exercise on resting metabolic rate in healthy males. / Kelly, Benjamin; King, James A; Goerlach, Jonas; Nimmo, Myra A.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 113, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 3039-47.

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Kelly, Benjamin ; King, James A ; Goerlach, Jonas ; Nimmo, Myra A. / The impact of high-intensity intermittent exercise on resting metabolic rate in healthy males. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2013 ; Vol. 113, No. 12. pp. 3039-47.

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@article{fc3ed59313b74641bf53ec4367769627,
title = "The impact of high-intensity intermittent exercise on resting metabolic rate in healthy males",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: High-intensity intermittent exercise training (HIT) may favourably alter body composition despite low training volumes and predicted energy expenditure (EE).PURPOSE: To characterise the acute impact of two common HIT protocols on EE and post-exercise oxygen consumption (11 h EPOC).METHODS: Oxygen consumption (l min(-1)), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and EE were measured in nine healthy, lean males over 12 h under three conditions: control (CON), HIT1 (10 × 1 min high-intensity cycling bouts followed by 1 min rest) and HIT2 (10 × 4 min high-intensity cycling bouts followed by 2 min rest).RESULTS: Total exercise period EE during HIT1 (1,151 ± 205 kJ) (mean ± SD) was significantly lower than HIT2 (2,788 ± 322 kJ; p < 0.001). EE within the 60 min after exercise was significantly albeit marginally higher after HIT1 (388 ± 44 kJ; p = 0.02) and HIT2 (389 ± 39 kJ; p = 0.01) compared with CON (329 ± 39 kJ), with no difference between exercise conditions (p = 0.778). RER during this period was significantly lower in HIT1 (0.78 ± 0.06; p = 0.011) and HIT2 (0.76 ± 0.04; p = 0.004) compared with CON (0.87 ± 0.06). During the 'slow phase' of EPOC (1.25-9.75 h), there were no significant differences in EE (p = 0.07) or RER (p = 0.173) between trials.CONCLUSIONS: Single HIT sessions notably increases EE during exertion; however, the influence on metabolic rate post-exercise is transient and relatively minor.",
keywords = "Basal Metabolism, Case-Control Studies, Cool-Down Exercise, Humans, Male, Oxygen Consumption, Time Factors, Young Adult",
author = "Benjamin Kelly and King, {James A} and Jonas Goerlach and Nimmo, {Myra A}",
year = "2013",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1007/s00421-013-2741-5",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "3039--47",
journal = "European Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "1439-6319",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of high-intensity intermittent exercise on resting metabolic rate in healthy males

AU - Kelly, Benjamin

AU - King, James A

AU - Goerlach, Jonas

AU - Nimmo, Myra A

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - INTRODUCTION: High-intensity intermittent exercise training (HIT) may favourably alter body composition despite low training volumes and predicted energy expenditure (EE).PURPOSE: To characterise the acute impact of two common HIT protocols on EE and post-exercise oxygen consumption (11 h EPOC).METHODS: Oxygen consumption (l min(-1)), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and EE were measured in nine healthy, lean males over 12 h under three conditions: control (CON), HIT1 (10 × 1 min high-intensity cycling bouts followed by 1 min rest) and HIT2 (10 × 4 min high-intensity cycling bouts followed by 2 min rest).RESULTS: Total exercise period EE during HIT1 (1,151 ± 205 kJ) (mean ± SD) was significantly lower than HIT2 (2,788 ± 322 kJ; p < 0.001). EE within the 60 min after exercise was significantly albeit marginally higher after HIT1 (388 ± 44 kJ; p = 0.02) and HIT2 (389 ± 39 kJ; p = 0.01) compared with CON (329 ± 39 kJ), with no difference between exercise conditions (p = 0.778). RER during this period was significantly lower in HIT1 (0.78 ± 0.06; p = 0.011) and HIT2 (0.76 ± 0.04; p = 0.004) compared with CON (0.87 ± 0.06). During the 'slow phase' of EPOC (1.25-9.75 h), there were no significant differences in EE (p = 0.07) or RER (p = 0.173) between trials.CONCLUSIONS: Single HIT sessions notably increases EE during exertion; however, the influence on metabolic rate post-exercise is transient and relatively minor.

AB - INTRODUCTION: High-intensity intermittent exercise training (HIT) may favourably alter body composition despite low training volumes and predicted energy expenditure (EE).PURPOSE: To characterise the acute impact of two common HIT protocols on EE and post-exercise oxygen consumption (11 h EPOC).METHODS: Oxygen consumption (l min(-1)), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and EE were measured in nine healthy, lean males over 12 h under three conditions: control (CON), HIT1 (10 × 1 min high-intensity cycling bouts followed by 1 min rest) and HIT2 (10 × 4 min high-intensity cycling bouts followed by 2 min rest).RESULTS: Total exercise period EE during HIT1 (1,151 ± 205 kJ) (mean ± SD) was significantly lower than HIT2 (2,788 ± 322 kJ; p < 0.001). EE within the 60 min after exercise was significantly albeit marginally higher after HIT1 (388 ± 44 kJ; p = 0.02) and HIT2 (389 ± 39 kJ; p = 0.01) compared with CON (329 ± 39 kJ), with no difference between exercise conditions (p = 0.778). RER during this period was significantly lower in HIT1 (0.78 ± 0.06; p = 0.011) and HIT2 (0.76 ± 0.04; p = 0.004) compared with CON (0.87 ± 0.06). During the 'slow phase' of EPOC (1.25-9.75 h), there were no significant differences in EE (p = 0.07) or RER (p = 0.173) between trials.CONCLUSIONS: Single HIT sessions notably increases EE during exertion; however, the influence on metabolic rate post-exercise is transient and relatively minor.

KW - Basal Metabolism

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Cool-Down Exercise

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Oxygen Consumption

KW - Time Factors

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-013-2741-5

DO - 10.1007/s00421-013-2741-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 24097174

VL - 113

SP - 3039

EP - 3047

JO - European Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - European Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 1439-6319

IS - 12

ER -