The gothic coast: boundaries, belonging, and coastal community in contemporary British fiction

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The gothic coast: boundaries, belonging, and coastal community in contemporary British fiction. / Packham, Jimmy.

In: Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction, Vol. 60, No. 2, 25.10.2018, p. 205-221.

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@article{872b8b61774341a4b5b794814d31078b,
title = "The gothic coast:: boundaries, belonging, and coastal community in contemporary British fiction",
abstract = "This essay argues that recent British gothic fiction is characterised by the detailed attention it pays to coastal landscapes, giving particular focus to Andrew Michael Hurley{\textquoteright}s The Loney, Wyl Menmuir{\textquoteright}s The Many, and Daisy Johnson{\textquoteright}s Fen. I read these novels as participants in a broader debate around the symbolic power of the British coastline, and situate them in relation to current work in the field of coastal studies, and in connection with contemporarypolitical discourses that see the coast – the spaces that illuminates Britain{\textquoteright}s relation to the wider world – as a potent site to explore anxieties of belonging, nationhood, and national identity. This is a fiction responding directly to rising nationalism in the twenty-first century and to anxieties around the significance – and fragility – of borders.",
keywords = "the gotic, coastal studies, nationhood and identity, ecotone, ecologies",
author = "Jimmy Packham",
year = "2018",
month = oct,
day = "25",
doi = "10.1080/00111619.2018.1524744",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "205--221",
journal = "Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction",
issn = "0011-1619",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The gothic coast:

T2 - boundaries, belonging, and coastal community in contemporary British fiction

AU - Packham, Jimmy

PY - 2018/10/25

Y1 - 2018/10/25

N2 - This essay argues that recent British gothic fiction is characterised by the detailed attention it pays to coastal landscapes, giving particular focus to Andrew Michael Hurley’s The Loney, Wyl Menmuir’s The Many, and Daisy Johnson’s Fen. I read these novels as participants in a broader debate around the symbolic power of the British coastline, and situate them in relation to current work in the field of coastal studies, and in connection with contemporarypolitical discourses that see the coast – the spaces that illuminates Britain’s relation to the wider world – as a potent site to explore anxieties of belonging, nationhood, and national identity. This is a fiction responding directly to rising nationalism in the twenty-first century and to anxieties around the significance – and fragility – of borders.

AB - This essay argues that recent British gothic fiction is characterised by the detailed attention it pays to coastal landscapes, giving particular focus to Andrew Michael Hurley’s The Loney, Wyl Menmuir’s The Many, and Daisy Johnson’s Fen. I read these novels as participants in a broader debate around the symbolic power of the British coastline, and situate them in relation to current work in the field of coastal studies, and in connection with contemporarypolitical discourses that see the coast – the spaces that illuminates Britain’s relation to the wider world – as a potent site to explore anxieties of belonging, nationhood, and national identity. This is a fiction responding directly to rising nationalism in the twenty-first century and to anxieties around the significance – and fragility – of borders.

KW - the gotic

KW - coastal studies

KW - nationhood and identity

KW - ecotone

KW - ecologies

U2 - 10.1080/00111619.2018.1524744

DO - 10.1080/00111619.2018.1524744

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 205

EP - 221

JO - Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction

JF - Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction

SN - 0011-1619

IS - 2

ER -