The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma. / O’brien, K.S.; Puhl, R.M.; Latner, J.D.; Lynott, D.; Reid, J.D.; Vakhitova, Z.; Hunter, J.A.; Scarf, D.; Jeanes, R.; Bouguettaya, A.; Carter, A.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 12, No. 2, 294, 22.01.2020, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

O’brien, KS, Puhl, RM, Latner, JD, Lynott, D, Reid, JD, Vakhitova, Z, Hunter, JA, Scarf, D, Jeanes, R, Bouguettaya, A & Carter, A 2020, 'The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma', Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 2, 294, pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020294

APA

O’brien, K. S., Puhl, R. M., Latner, J. D., Lynott, D., Reid, J. D., Vakhitova, Z., Hunter, J. A., Scarf, D., Jeanes, R., Bouguettaya, A., & Carter, A. (2020). The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma. Nutrients, 12(2), 1-10. [294]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020294

Vancouver

O’brien KS, Puhl RM, Latner JD, Lynott D, Reid JD, Vakhitova Z et al. The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma. Nutrients. 2020 Jan 22;12(2):1-10. 294. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020294

Author

O’brien, K.S. ; Puhl, R.M. ; Latner, J.D. ; Lynott, D. ; Reid, J.D. ; Vakhitova, Z. ; Hunter, J.A. ; Scarf, D. ; Jeanes, R. ; Bouguettaya, A. ; Carter, A. / The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma. In: Nutrients. 2020 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 1-10.

Bibtex

@article{0914c75c086c4b5bb20918b763e8e5e5,
title = "The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma",
abstract = "There is increasing scientific and public support for the notion that some foods may be addictive, and that poor weight control and obesity may, for some people, stem from having a food addiction. However, it remains unclear how a food addiction model (FAM) explanation for obesity and weight control will affect weight stigma. In two experiments (N = 530 and N = 690), we tested the effect of a food addiction explanation for obesity and weight control on weight stigma. In Experiment 1, participants who received a FAM explanation for weight control and obesity reported lower weight stigma scores (e.g., less dislike of 'fat people', and lower personal willpower blame) than those receiving an explanation emphasizing diet and exercise (F(4,525) = 7.675, p = 0.006; and F(4,525) = 5.393, p = 0.021, respectively). In Experiment 2, there was a significant group difference for the dislike of 'fat people' stigma measure (F(5,684) = 5.157, p = 0.006), but not for personal willpower weight stigma (F(5,684) = 0.217, p = 0.81). Participants receiving the diet and exercise explanation had greater dislike of 'fat people' than those in the FAM explanation and control group (p values < 0.05), with no difference between the FAM and control groups (p >0.05). The FAM explanation for weight control and obesity did not increase weight stigma and resulted in lower stigma than the diet and exercise explanation that attributes obesity to personal control. The results highlight the importance of health messaging about the causes of obesity and the need for communications that do not exacerbate weight stigma.",
keywords = "food addiction, obesity, obesity prejudice reduction, stigma, weight bias, weight stigma",
author = "K.S. O{\textquoteright}brien and R.M. Puhl and J.D. Latner and D. Lynott and J.D. Reid and Z. Vakhitova and J.A. Hunter and D. Scarf and R. Jeanes and A. Bouguettaya and A. Carter",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
day = "22",
doi = "10.3390/nu12020294",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of a food addiction explanation model for weight control and obesity on weight stigma

AU - O’brien, K.S.

AU - Puhl, R.M.

AU - Latner, J.D.

AU - Lynott, D.

AU - Reid, J.D.

AU - Vakhitova, Z.

AU - Hunter, J.A.

AU - Scarf, D.

AU - Jeanes, R.

AU - Bouguettaya, A.

AU - Carter, A.

PY - 2020/1/22

Y1 - 2020/1/22

N2 - There is increasing scientific and public support for the notion that some foods may be addictive, and that poor weight control and obesity may, for some people, stem from having a food addiction. However, it remains unclear how a food addiction model (FAM) explanation for obesity and weight control will affect weight stigma. In two experiments (N = 530 and N = 690), we tested the effect of a food addiction explanation for obesity and weight control on weight stigma. In Experiment 1, participants who received a FAM explanation for weight control and obesity reported lower weight stigma scores (e.g., less dislike of 'fat people', and lower personal willpower blame) than those receiving an explanation emphasizing diet and exercise (F(4,525) = 7.675, p = 0.006; and F(4,525) = 5.393, p = 0.021, respectively). In Experiment 2, there was a significant group difference for the dislike of 'fat people' stigma measure (F(5,684) = 5.157, p = 0.006), but not for personal willpower weight stigma (F(5,684) = 0.217, p = 0.81). Participants receiving the diet and exercise explanation had greater dislike of 'fat people' than those in the FAM explanation and control group (p values < 0.05), with no difference between the FAM and control groups (p >0.05). The FAM explanation for weight control and obesity did not increase weight stigma and resulted in lower stigma than the diet and exercise explanation that attributes obesity to personal control. The results highlight the importance of health messaging about the causes of obesity and the need for communications that do not exacerbate weight stigma.

AB - There is increasing scientific and public support for the notion that some foods may be addictive, and that poor weight control and obesity may, for some people, stem from having a food addiction. However, it remains unclear how a food addiction model (FAM) explanation for obesity and weight control will affect weight stigma. In two experiments (N = 530 and N = 690), we tested the effect of a food addiction explanation for obesity and weight control on weight stigma. In Experiment 1, participants who received a FAM explanation for weight control and obesity reported lower weight stigma scores (e.g., less dislike of 'fat people', and lower personal willpower blame) than those receiving an explanation emphasizing diet and exercise (F(4,525) = 7.675, p = 0.006; and F(4,525) = 5.393, p = 0.021, respectively). In Experiment 2, there was a significant group difference for the dislike of 'fat people' stigma measure (F(5,684) = 5.157, p = 0.006), but not for personal willpower weight stigma (F(5,684) = 0.217, p = 0.81). Participants receiving the diet and exercise explanation had greater dislike of 'fat people' than those in the FAM explanation and control group (p values < 0.05), with no difference between the FAM and control groups (p >0.05). The FAM explanation for weight control and obesity did not increase weight stigma and resulted in lower stigma than the diet and exercise explanation that attributes obesity to personal control. The results highlight the importance of health messaging about the causes of obesity and the need for communications that do not exacerbate weight stigma.

KW - food addiction

KW - obesity

KW - obesity prejudice reduction

KW - stigma

KW - weight bias

KW - weight stigma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-85078318023&partnerID=MN8TOARS

U2 - 10.3390/nu12020294

DO - 10.3390/nu12020294

M3 - Article

C2 - 31978983

VL - 12

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 2

M1 - 294

ER -