The early development of self-injurious behavior: An empirical study

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The early development of self-injurious behavior: An empirical study. / Hall, Scott; Murphy, G; Oliver, Christopher.

In: American Journal on Mental Retardation, Vol. 106, 01.01.2001, p. 189-199.

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@article{0609674b50b44c9594c2004e338a8391,
title = "The early development of self-injurious behavior: An empirical study",
abstract = "The early development of SIB in young children with developmental disabilities was examined by tracking over an 18-month period 16 school-age children who had recently started to show early SIB. Naturalistic observations were conducted in each child's classroom every 3 months, and the association between early SIB and environmental events was examined. Results showed that for the 4 children whose early SIB had escalated over this period, there was a significant association between early SIB and low levels of social contact across observation points, supporting models of the development of SIB. This association might be considered as a risk marker for the exacerbation of SIB. Implications of this finding for targeting early interventions for SIB are discussed.",
author = "Scott Hall and G Murphy and Christopher Oliver",
year = "2001",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1352/0895-8017(2001)106<0189:EDOSIB>2.0.CO;2",
language = "English",
volume = "106",
pages = "189--199",
journal = "American Journal on Mental Retardation",
issn = "0895-8017",
publisher = "American Association on Mental Retardation",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The early development of self-injurious behavior: An empirical study

AU - Hall, Scott

AU - Murphy, G

AU - Oliver, Christopher

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - The early development of SIB in young children with developmental disabilities was examined by tracking over an 18-month period 16 school-age children who had recently started to show early SIB. Naturalistic observations were conducted in each child's classroom every 3 months, and the association between early SIB and environmental events was examined. Results showed that for the 4 children whose early SIB had escalated over this period, there was a significant association between early SIB and low levels of social contact across observation points, supporting models of the development of SIB. This association might be considered as a risk marker for the exacerbation of SIB. Implications of this finding for targeting early interventions for SIB are discussed.

AB - The early development of SIB in young children with developmental disabilities was examined by tracking over an 18-month period 16 school-age children who had recently started to show early SIB. Naturalistic observations were conducted in each child's classroom every 3 months, and the association between early SIB and environmental events was examined. Results showed that for the 4 children whose early SIB had escalated over this period, there was a significant association between early SIB and low levels of social contact across observation points, supporting models of the development of SIB. This association might be considered as a risk marker for the exacerbation of SIB. Implications of this finding for targeting early interventions for SIB are discussed.

U2 - 10.1352/0895-8017(2001)106<0189:EDOSIB>2.0.CO;2

DO - 10.1352/0895-8017(2001)106<0189:EDOSIB>2.0.CO;2

M3 - Article

C2 - 11321609

VL - 106

SP - 189

EP - 199

JO - American Journal on Mental Retardation

JF - American Journal on Mental Retardation

SN - 0895-8017

ER -