The development of children's regret and relief

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The development of children's regret and relief. / Weisberg, DP; Beck, Sarah.

In: Cognition & emotion, Vol. 26, No. 5, 2012, p. 820-35.

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Weisberg, DP ; Beck, Sarah. / The development of children's regret and relief. In: Cognition & emotion. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 820-35.

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@article{1077487b1a894204a2668882f655dbfe,
title = "The development of children's regret and relief",
abstract = "Previous research found that children first experience regret at 5 years and relief at 7. In two experiments, we explored three possibilities for this lag: (1) relief genuinely develops later than regret; (2) tests of relief have previously been artefactually difficult; or (3) evidence for regret resulted from false positives. In Experiment 1 (N=162 4- to 7-year-olds) children chose one of two cards that led to winning or losing tokens. Children rated their happiness then saw a better (regret) or worse (relief) alternative. Children re-rated their happiness. Regret after winning was first experienced at 4, regret after losing and relief after winning were experienced at 5 years and relief after losing at 7 years. Experiment 2 (N=297 5- to 8-year-olds) used a similar task but manipulated children's responsibility for the outcome. Greater responsibility for the outcome resulted in a greater likelihood of an experience of regret and relief. Results support that previous tests of relief were artefactually difficult and regret and relief are experienced earlier than previously thought.",
author = "DP Weisberg and Sarah Beck",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1080/02699931.2011.621933",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "820--35",
journal = "Cognition & emotion",
issn = "0269-9931",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The development of children's regret and relief

AU - Weisberg, DP

AU - Beck, Sarah

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Previous research found that children first experience regret at 5 years and relief at 7. In two experiments, we explored three possibilities for this lag: (1) relief genuinely develops later than regret; (2) tests of relief have previously been artefactually difficult; or (3) evidence for regret resulted from false positives. In Experiment 1 (N=162 4- to 7-year-olds) children chose one of two cards that led to winning or losing tokens. Children rated their happiness then saw a better (regret) or worse (relief) alternative. Children re-rated their happiness. Regret after winning was first experienced at 4, regret after losing and relief after winning were experienced at 5 years and relief after losing at 7 years. Experiment 2 (N=297 5- to 8-year-olds) used a similar task but manipulated children's responsibility for the outcome. Greater responsibility for the outcome resulted in a greater likelihood of an experience of regret and relief. Results support that previous tests of relief were artefactually difficult and regret and relief are experienced earlier than previously thought.

AB - Previous research found that children first experience regret at 5 years and relief at 7. In two experiments, we explored three possibilities for this lag: (1) relief genuinely develops later than regret; (2) tests of relief have previously been artefactually difficult; or (3) evidence for regret resulted from false positives. In Experiment 1 (N=162 4- to 7-year-olds) children chose one of two cards that led to winning or losing tokens. Children rated their happiness then saw a better (regret) or worse (relief) alternative. Children re-rated their happiness. Regret after winning was first experienced at 4, regret after losing and relief after winning were experienced at 5 years and relief after losing at 7 years. Experiment 2 (N=297 5- to 8-year-olds) used a similar task but manipulated children's responsibility for the outcome. Greater responsibility for the outcome resulted in a greater likelihood of an experience of regret and relief. Results support that previous tests of relief were artefactually difficult and regret and relief are experienced earlier than previously thought.

U2 - 10.1080/02699931.2011.621933

DO - 10.1080/02699931.2011.621933

M3 - Article

C2 - 22077850

VL - 26

SP - 820

EP - 835

JO - Cognition & emotion

JF - Cognition & emotion

SN - 0269-9931

IS - 5

ER -