The A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene is not associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

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@article{ae2c22bd3230443aaf8a87926f99f0d0,
title = "The A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene is not associated with systemic lupus erythematosus",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Factors contributing to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remain largely unknown although are likely to include both environmental and genetic components. Studies on murine lupus have indicated a role for an antibody that blocks binding of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated-4 (CTLA-4) to B7 on antigen presenting cells in the treatment of disease, suggesting that CTLA-4 may play an important part in the disease process. This study, therefore, investigated the frequency of a previously described A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene, the G allele of which has shown to be associated with both Graves' disease and type I diabetes, to determine whether this polymorphism was playing a part in the development of SLE. METHODS: One hundred and twenty six SLE patients and 363 control subjects were genotyped for the A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene. Target DNA was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the resulting product was digested using the BbvI restriction enzyme. RESULTS: No differences in allele or genotype frequencies were observed between patients with SLE and control subjects. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that the A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene does not play a part in the genetic susceptibility to the development of SLE.",
author = "Caroline Gordon and J Heward and Amit Allahabadia and Anthony Barnett and Jayne Franklyn and Stephen Gough",
year = "1999",
month = mar
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "193--5",
journal = "Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases",
issn = "0003-4967",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene is not associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

AU - Gordon, Caroline

AU - Heward, J

AU - Allahabadia, Amit

AU - Barnett, Anthony

AU - Franklyn, Jayne

AU - Gough, Stephen

PY - 1999/3/1

Y1 - 1999/3/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Factors contributing to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remain largely unknown although are likely to include both environmental and genetic components. Studies on murine lupus have indicated a role for an antibody that blocks binding of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated-4 (CTLA-4) to B7 on antigen presenting cells in the treatment of disease, suggesting that CTLA-4 may play an important part in the disease process. This study, therefore, investigated the frequency of a previously described A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene, the G allele of which has shown to be associated with both Graves' disease and type I diabetes, to determine whether this polymorphism was playing a part in the development of SLE. METHODS: One hundred and twenty six SLE patients and 363 control subjects were genotyped for the A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene. Target DNA was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the resulting product was digested using the BbvI restriction enzyme. RESULTS: No differences in allele or genotype frequencies were observed between patients with SLE and control subjects. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that the A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene does not play a part in the genetic susceptibility to the development of SLE.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Factors contributing to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remain largely unknown although are likely to include both environmental and genetic components. Studies on murine lupus have indicated a role for an antibody that blocks binding of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated-4 (CTLA-4) to B7 on antigen presenting cells in the treatment of disease, suggesting that CTLA-4 may play an important part in the disease process. This study, therefore, investigated the frequency of a previously described A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene, the G allele of which has shown to be associated with both Graves' disease and type I diabetes, to determine whether this polymorphism was playing a part in the development of SLE. METHODS: One hundred and twenty six SLE patients and 363 control subjects were genotyped for the A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene. Target DNA was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the resulting product was digested using the BbvI restriction enzyme. RESULTS: No differences in allele or genotype frequencies were observed between patients with SLE and control subjects. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that the A-G polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene does not play a part in the genetic susceptibility to the development of SLE.

M3 - Article

C2 - 10364920

VL - 58

SP - 193

EP - 195

JO - Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

JF - Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

SN - 0003-4967

IS - 3

ER -