Testing the domain-specificity of a theory of mind deficit in brain-injured patients: evidence for consistent performance on non-verbal, "reality-unknown" false belief and false photograph tasks

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@article{45be3cb524de41a9a3d71c6c822267e1,
title = "Testing the domain-specificity of a theory of mind deficit in brain-injured patients: evidence for consistent performance on non-verbal, {"}reality-unknown{"} false belief and false photograph tasks",
abstract = "To test the domain-specificity of {"}theory of mind{"} abilities we compared the performance of a case-series of 11 brain-lesioned patients on a recently developed test of false belief reasoning () and on a matched false photograph task, which did not require belief reasoning and which addressed problems with existing false photograph methods. A strikingly similar pattern of performance was shown across the false belief and false photograph tests. Patients who were selectively impaired on false belief tasks were also impaired on false photograph tasks; patients spared on false belief tasks also showed preserved performance with false photographs. In some cases the impairment on false belief and false photograph tasks coincided with good performance on control tasks matched for executive demands. We discuss whether the patients have a domain-specific deficit in reasoning about representations common to both false belief and false photograph tasks.",
keywords = "false photograph, theory of mind, metarepresentation, domain specificity, social cognitive neuroscience, temporo-parietal junction, false belief",
author = "Ian Apperly and Dana Samson and C Chiavarino and W Bickerton and Glyn Humphreys",
year = "2007",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.cognition.2006.04.012",
language = "English",
volume = "103",
pages = "300--321",
journal = "Cognition",
issn = "0010-0277",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Testing the domain-specificity of a theory of mind deficit in brain-injured patients: evidence for consistent performance on non-verbal, "reality-unknown" false belief and false photograph tasks

AU - Apperly, Ian

AU - Samson, Dana

AU - Chiavarino, C

AU - Bickerton, W

AU - Humphreys, Glyn

PY - 2007/5/1

Y1 - 2007/5/1

N2 - To test the domain-specificity of "theory of mind" abilities we compared the performance of a case-series of 11 brain-lesioned patients on a recently developed test of false belief reasoning () and on a matched false photograph task, which did not require belief reasoning and which addressed problems with existing false photograph methods. A strikingly similar pattern of performance was shown across the false belief and false photograph tests. Patients who were selectively impaired on false belief tasks were also impaired on false photograph tasks; patients spared on false belief tasks also showed preserved performance with false photographs. In some cases the impairment on false belief and false photograph tasks coincided with good performance on control tasks matched for executive demands. We discuss whether the patients have a domain-specific deficit in reasoning about representations common to both false belief and false photograph tasks.

AB - To test the domain-specificity of "theory of mind" abilities we compared the performance of a case-series of 11 brain-lesioned patients on a recently developed test of false belief reasoning () and on a matched false photograph task, which did not require belief reasoning and which addressed problems with existing false photograph methods. A strikingly similar pattern of performance was shown across the false belief and false photograph tests. Patients who were selectively impaired on false belief tasks were also impaired on false photograph tasks; patients spared on false belief tasks also showed preserved performance with false photographs. In some cases the impairment on false belief and false photograph tasks coincided with good performance on control tasks matched for executive demands. We discuss whether the patients have a domain-specific deficit in reasoning about representations common to both false belief and false photograph tasks.

KW - false photograph

KW - theory of mind

KW - metarepresentation

KW - domain specificity

KW - social cognitive neuroscience

KW - temporo-parietal junction

KW - false belief

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33847105960&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cognition.2006.04.012

DO - 10.1016/j.cognition.2006.04.012

M3 - Article

C2 - 16781700

VL - 103

SP - 300

EP - 321

JO - Cognition

JF - Cognition

SN - 0010-0277

ER -