Temperate performance and metabolic adaptations following endurance training performed under environmental heat stress

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Temperate performance and metabolic adaptations following endurance training performed under environmental heat stress. / Maunder, Ed; Plews, Daniel J.; Wallis, Gareth A.; Brick, Matthew J.; Leigh, Warren B.; Chang, Wee Leong; Watkins, Casey M.; Kilding, Andrew E.

In: Physiological reports, Vol. 9, No. 9, e14849, 12.05.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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APA

Maunder, E., Plews, D. J., Wallis, G. A., Brick, M. J., Leigh, W. B., Chang, W. L., Watkins, C. M., & Kilding, A. E. (2021). Temperate performance and metabolic adaptations following endurance training performed under environmental heat stress. Physiological reports, 9(9), [e14849]. https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14849

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Maunder, Ed ; Plews, Daniel J. ; Wallis, Gareth A. ; Brick, Matthew J. ; Leigh, Warren B. ; Chang, Wee Leong ; Watkins, Casey M. ; Kilding, Andrew E. / Temperate performance and metabolic adaptations following endurance training performed under environmental heat stress. In: Physiological reports. 2021 ; Vol. 9, No. 9.

Bibtex

@article{82b8f5b2035e4e8daecb889fb575c003,
title = "Temperate performance and metabolic adaptations following endurance training performed under environmental heat stress",
abstract = "Endurance athletes are frequently exposed to environmental heat stress during training. We investigated whether exposure to 33°C during training would improve endurance performance in temperate conditions and stimulate mitochondrial adaptations. Seventeen endurance-trained males were randomly assigned to perform a 3-week training intervention in 18°C (TEMP) or 33°C (HEAT). An incremental test and 30-min time-trial preceded by 2-h low-intensity cycling were performed in 18°C pre- and post-intervention, along with a resting vastus lateralis microbiopsy. Training was matched for relative cardiovascular demand using heart rates measured at the first and second ventilatory thresholds, along with a weekly “best-effort” interval session. Perceived training load was similar between-groups, despite lower power outputs during training in HEAT versus TEMP (p <.05). Time-trial performance improved to a greater extent in HEAT than TEMP (30 ± 13 vs. 16 ± 5 W, N = 7 vs. N = 6, p =.04), and citrate synthase activity increased in HEAT (fold-change, 1.25 ± 0.25, p =.03, N = 9) but not TEMP (1.10 ± 0.22, p =.22, N = 7). Training-induced changes in time-trial performance and citrate synthase activity were related (r =.51, p =.04). A group × time interaction for peak fat oxidation was observed (Δ 0.05 ± 0.14 vs. −0.09 ± 0.12 g·min−1 in TEMP and HEAT, N = 9 vs. N = 8, p =.05). Our data suggest exposure to moderate environmental heat stress during endurance training may be useful for inducing adaptations relevant to performance in temperate conditions.",
keywords = "adaptation, endurance training, heat stress, mitochondria, performance",
author = "Ed Maunder and Plews, {Daniel J.} and Wallis, {Gareth A.} and Brick, {Matthew J.} and Leigh, {Warren B.} and Chang, {Wee Leong} and Watkins, {Casey M.} and Kilding, {Andrew E.}",
note = "Funding Information: E.M. was supported by an Education New Zealand International Doctoral Research Scholarship. No other sources of funding were used in the preparation of this manuscript. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "12",
doi = "10.14814/phy2.14849",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "Physiological reports",
issn = "2051-817X",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temperate performance and metabolic adaptations following endurance training performed under environmental heat stress

AU - Maunder, Ed

AU - Plews, Daniel J.

AU - Wallis, Gareth A.

AU - Brick, Matthew J.

AU - Leigh, Warren B.

AU - Chang, Wee Leong

AU - Watkins, Casey M.

AU - Kilding, Andrew E.

N1 - Funding Information: E.M. was supported by an Education New Zealand International Doctoral Research Scholarship. No other sources of funding were used in the preparation of this manuscript. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society

PY - 2021/5/12

Y1 - 2021/5/12

N2 - Endurance athletes are frequently exposed to environmental heat stress during training. We investigated whether exposure to 33°C during training would improve endurance performance in temperate conditions and stimulate mitochondrial adaptations. Seventeen endurance-trained males were randomly assigned to perform a 3-week training intervention in 18°C (TEMP) or 33°C (HEAT). An incremental test and 30-min time-trial preceded by 2-h low-intensity cycling were performed in 18°C pre- and post-intervention, along with a resting vastus lateralis microbiopsy. Training was matched for relative cardiovascular demand using heart rates measured at the first and second ventilatory thresholds, along with a weekly “best-effort” interval session. Perceived training load was similar between-groups, despite lower power outputs during training in HEAT versus TEMP (p <.05). Time-trial performance improved to a greater extent in HEAT than TEMP (30 ± 13 vs. 16 ± 5 W, N = 7 vs. N = 6, p =.04), and citrate synthase activity increased in HEAT (fold-change, 1.25 ± 0.25, p =.03, N = 9) but not TEMP (1.10 ± 0.22, p =.22, N = 7). Training-induced changes in time-trial performance and citrate synthase activity were related (r =.51, p =.04). A group × time interaction for peak fat oxidation was observed (Δ 0.05 ± 0.14 vs. −0.09 ± 0.12 g·min−1 in TEMP and HEAT, N = 9 vs. N = 8, p =.05). Our data suggest exposure to moderate environmental heat stress during endurance training may be useful for inducing adaptations relevant to performance in temperate conditions.

AB - Endurance athletes are frequently exposed to environmental heat stress during training. We investigated whether exposure to 33°C during training would improve endurance performance in temperate conditions and stimulate mitochondrial adaptations. Seventeen endurance-trained males were randomly assigned to perform a 3-week training intervention in 18°C (TEMP) or 33°C (HEAT). An incremental test and 30-min time-trial preceded by 2-h low-intensity cycling were performed in 18°C pre- and post-intervention, along with a resting vastus lateralis microbiopsy. Training was matched for relative cardiovascular demand using heart rates measured at the first and second ventilatory thresholds, along with a weekly “best-effort” interval session. Perceived training load was similar between-groups, despite lower power outputs during training in HEAT versus TEMP (p <.05). Time-trial performance improved to a greater extent in HEAT than TEMP (30 ± 13 vs. 16 ± 5 W, N = 7 vs. N = 6, p =.04), and citrate synthase activity increased in HEAT (fold-change, 1.25 ± 0.25, p =.03, N = 9) but not TEMP (1.10 ± 0.22, p =.22, N = 7). Training-induced changes in time-trial performance and citrate synthase activity were related (r =.51, p =.04). A group × time interaction for peak fat oxidation was observed (Δ 0.05 ± 0.14 vs. −0.09 ± 0.12 g·min−1 in TEMP and HEAT, N = 9 vs. N = 8, p =.05). Our data suggest exposure to moderate environmental heat stress during endurance training may be useful for inducing adaptations relevant to performance in temperate conditions.

KW - adaptation

KW - endurance training

KW - heat stress

KW - mitochondria

KW - performance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85105743467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.14814/phy2.14849

DO - 10.14814/phy2.14849

M3 - Article

C2 - 33977674

AN - SCOPUS:85105743467

VL - 9

JO - Physiological reports

JF - Physiological reports

SN - 2051-817X

IS - 9

M1 - e14849

ER -