Take action to prevent diabetes- The IMAGE toolkit for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in Europe

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Take action to prevent diabetes- The IMAGE toolkit for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in Europe. / The IMAGE Study Group ; Greaves, C. J. (Contributor).

In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, Vol. 42, No. SUPPL. 1, 13.04.2010, p. S37-S55.

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@article{4b7b0ba329a7400ca88739b1ad457f72,
title = "Take action to prevent diabetes- The IMAGE toolkit for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in Europe",
abstract = "Executive Summary When we ask people what they value most, health is usually top of the list. While effective care is available for many chronic diseases, the fact remains that for the patient, the tax payer and the whole of society: Prevention is Better Than Cure. Diabetes and its complications are a serious threat to the survival and well-being of an increasing number of people. It is predicted that one in ten Europeans aged 2079 will have developed diabetes by 2030. Once a disease of old age, diabetes is now common among adults of all ages and is beginning to affect adolescents and even children. Diabetes accounts for up to 18% of total healthcare expenditure in Europe. The Good News is That Diabetes is Preventable. Compelling evidence shows that the onset of diabetes can be prevented or delayed greatly in individuals at high risk (people with impaired glucose regulation). Clinical research has shown a reduction in risk of developing diabetes of over 50% following relatively modest changes in lifestyle that include adopting a healthy diet, increasing physical activity, and maintaining a healthy body weight. These results have since been reproduced in real-world prevention programmes. Even a delay of a few years in the progression to diabetes is expected to reduce diabetes-related complications, such as heart, kidney and eye disease and, consequently, to reduce the cost to society. A comprehensive approach to diabetes prevention should combine population based primary prevention with programmes targeted at those who are at high risk. This approach should take account of the local circumstances and diversity within modern society (e.g. social inequalities). The challenge goes beyond the healthcare system. We need to encourage collaboration across many different sectors: education providers, non-governmental organisations, the food industry, the media, urban planners and politicians all have a very important role to play. Small Changes in Lifestyle Will Bring Big Changes in Health.[nl]Through Joint Efforts, More People Will be Reached.[nl]The Time to Act is Now.",
author = "{The IMAGE Study Group} and J. Lindstr{\"o}m and A. Neumann and Sheppard, {K. E.} and A. Gilis-Januszewska and Greaves, {C. J.} and U. Handke and P. Pajunen and S. Puhl and A. P{\"o}l{\"o}nen and A. Rissanen and M. Roden and T. Stemper and V. Telle-Hjellset and J. Tuomilehto and D. Velickiene and Schwarz, {P. E.} and T. Acosta and M. Adler and A. Alkerwi and N. Barengo and R. Barengo and Boavida, {J. M.} and K. Charlesworth and V. Christov and B. Claussen and X. Cos and E. Cosson and S. Deceukelier and V. Dimitrijevic-Sreckovic and P. Djordjevic and P. Evans and Felton, {A. M.} and M. Fischer and R. Gabriel-Sanchez and A. Gilis-Januszewska and M. Goldfracht and Gomez, {J. L.} and Greaves, {C. J.} and M. Hall and U. Handke and H. Hauner and J. Herbst and N. Hermanns and L. Herrebrugh and C. Huber and U. H{\"u}hmer and J. Huttunen and A. Jotic and Z. Kamenov and S. Karadeniz",
year = "2010",
month = apr,
day = "13",
doi = "10.1055/s-0029-1240975",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "S37--S55",
journal = "Hormone and Metabolic Research",
issn = "0018-5043",
publisher = "Thieme Publishing",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Take action to prevent diabetes- The IMAGE toolkit for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in Europe

AU - The IMAGE Study Group

AU - Lindström, J.

AU - Neumann, A.

AU - Sheppard, K. E.

AU - Gilis-Januszewska, A.

AU - Greaves, C. J.

AU - Handke, U.

AU - Pajunen, P.

AU - Puhl, S.

AU - Pölönen, A.

AU - Rissanen, A.

AU - Roden, M.

AU - Stemper, T.

AU - Telle-Hjellset, V.

AU - Tuomilehto, J.

AU - Velickiene, D.

AU - Schwarz, P. E.

AU - Acosta, T.

AU - Adler, M.

AU - Alkerwi, A.

AU - Barengo, N.

AU - Barengo, R.

AU - Boavida, J. M.

AU - Charlesworth, K.

AU - Christov, V.

AU - Claussen, B.

AU - Cos, X.

AU - Cosson, E.

AU - Deceukelier, S.

AU - Dimitrijevic-Sreckovic, V.

AU - Djordjevic, P.

AU - Evans, P.

AU - Felton, A. M.

AU - Fischer, M.

AU - Gabriel-Sanchez, R.

AU - Gilis-Januszewska, A.

AU - Goldfracht, M.

AU - Gomez, J. L.

AU - Hall, M.

AU - Handke, U.

AU - Hauner, H.

AU - Herbst, J.

AU - Hermanns, N.

AU - Herrebrugh, L.

AU - Huber, C.

AU - Hühmer, U.

AU - Huttunen, J.

AU - Jotic, A.

AU - Kamenov, Z.

AU - Karadeniz, S.

A2 - Greaves, C. J.

PY - 2010/4/13

Y1 - 2010/4/13

N2 - Executive Summary When we ask people what they value most, health is usually top of the list. While effective care is available for many chronic diseases, the fact remains that for the patient, the tax payer and the whole of society: Prevention is Better Than Cure. Diabetes and its complications are a serious threat to the survival and well-being of an increasing number of people. It is predicted that one in ten Europeans aged 2079 will have developed diabetes by 2030. Once a disease of old age, diabetes is now common among adults of all ages and is beginning to affect adolescents and even children. Diabetes accounts for up to 18% of total healthcare expenditure in Europe. The Good News is That Diabetes is Preventable. Compelling evidence shows that the onset of diabetes can be prevented or delayed greatly in individuals at high risk (people with impaired glucose regulation). Clinical research has shown a reduction in risk of developing diabetes of over 50% following relatively modest changes in lifestyle that include adopting a healthy diet, increasing physical activity, and maintaining a healthy body weight. These results have since been reproduced in real-world prevention programmes. Even a delay of a few years in the progression to diabetes is expected to reduce diabetes-related complications, such as heart, kidney and eye disease and, consequently, to reduce the cost to society. A comprehensive approach to diabetes prevention should combine population based primary prevention with programmes targeted at those who are at high risk. This approach should take account of the local circumstances and diversity within modern society (e.g. social inequalities). The challenge goes beyond the healthcare system. We need to encourage collaboration across many different sectors: education providers, non-governmental organisations, the food industry, the media, urban planners and politicians all have a very important role to play. Small Changes in Lifestyle Will Bring Big Changes in Health.[nl]Through Joint Efforts, More People Will be Reached.[nl]The Time to Act is Now.

AB - Executive Summary When we ask people what they value most, health is usually top of the list. While effective care is available for many chronic diseases, the fact remains that for the patient, the tax payer and the whole of society: Prevention is Better Than Cure. Diabetes and its complications are a serious threat to the survival and well-being of an increasing number of people. It is predicted that one in ten Europeans aged 2079 will have developed diabetes by 2030. Once a disease of old age, diabetes is now common among adults of all ages and is beginning to affect adolescents and even children. Diabetes accounts for up to 18% of total healthcare expenditure in Europe. The Good News is That Diabetes is Preventable. Compelling evidence shows that the onset of diabetes can be prevented or delayed greatly in individuals at high risk (people with impaired glucose regulation). Clinical research has shown a reduction in risk of developing diabetes of over 50% following relatively modest changes in lifestyle that include adopting a healthy diet, increasing physical activity, and maintaining a healthy body weight. These results have since been reproduced in real-world prevention programmes. Even a delay of a few years in the progression to diabetes is expected to reduce diabetes-related complications, such as heart, kidney and eye disease and, consequently, to reduce the cost to society. A comprehensive approach to diabetes prevention should combine population based primary prevention with programmes targeted at those who are at high risk. This approach should take account of the local circumstances and diversity within modern society (e.g. social inequalities). The challenge goes beyond the healthcare system. We need to encourage collaboration across many different sectors: education providers, non-governmental organisations, the food industry, the media, urban planners and politicians all have a very important role to play. Small Changes in Lifestyle Will Bring Big Changes in Health.[nl]Through Joint Efforts, More People Will be Reached.[nl]The Time to Act is Now.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951049833&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1055/s-0029-1240975

DO - 10.1055/s-0029-1240975

M3 - Review article

C2 - 20391307

AN - SCOPUS:77951049833

VL - 42

SP - S37-S55

JO - Hormone and Metabolic Research

JF - Hormone and Metabolic Research

SN - 0018-5043

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -