Systematic review of effect of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality

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@article{4dc9a3f934c54baa92349c6026f1d13e,
title = "Systematic review of effect of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The objective was to provide a systematic review of the effectiveness of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality. METHODS: We searched published papers using Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, CINAHL, BNI, CAB ABSTRACTS, IBSS, Web of Science, LILACS and African Index Medicus from inception or at least 1982 to June 2006; searched unpublished works using National Research Register website, metaRegister and the WHO International Trial Registry portal. We hand searched major references.Selection criteria were maternity or childbearing age women, comparative study designs with concurrent controls, community-level interventions and maternal death as an outcome. We carried out study selection, data abstraction and quality assessment independently in duplicate. RESULTS: We found five cluster randomised controlled trials (RCT) and eight cohort studies of community-level interventions. We summarised results as odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI), combined using the Peto method for meta-analysis. Two high quality cluster RCTs, aimed at improving perinatal care practices, showed a reduction in maternal mortality reaching statistical significance (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.98). Three equivalence RCTs of minimal goal-oriented versus usual antenatal care showed no difference in maternal mortality (1.09, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.25). The cohort studies were of low quality and did not contribute further evidence. CONCLUSION: Community-level interventions of improved perinatal care practices can bring about a reduction in maternal mortality. This challenges the view that investment in such interventions is not worthwhile. Programmes to improve maternal mortality should be evaluated using randomised controlled techniques to generate further evidence.",
author = "Elaine Kidney and HR Winter and Khalid Khan and {G lmezoglu}, AM and Catherine Meads and Jonathan Deeks and Christine MacArthur",
year = "2009",
month = jan,
day = "20",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2393-9-2",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "BMC pregnancy and childbirth",
issn = "1471-2393",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Systematic review of effect of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality

AU - Kidney, Elaine

AU - Winter, HR

AU - Khan, Khalid

AU - G lmezoglu, AM

AU - Meads, Catherine

AU - Deeks, Jonathan

AU - MacArthur, Christine

PY - 2009/1/20

Y1 - 2009/1/20

N2 - BACKGROUND: The objective was to provide a systematic review of the effectiveness of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality. METHODS: We searched published papers using Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, CINAHL, BNI, CAB ABSTRACTS, IBSS, Web of Science, LILACS and African Index Medicus from inception or at least 1982 to June 2006; searched unpublished works using National Research Register website, metaRegister and the WHO International Trial Registry portal. We hand searched major references.Selection criteria were maternity or childbearing age women, comparative study designs with concurrent controls, community-level interventions and maternal death as an outcome. We carried out study selection, data abstraction and quality assessment independently in duplicate. RESULTS: We found five cluster randomised controlled trials (RCT) and eight cohort studies of community-level interventions. We summarised results as odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI), combined using the Peto method for meta-analysis. Two high quality cluster RCTs, aimed at improving perinatal care practices, showed a reduction in maternal mortality reaching statistical significance (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.98). Three equivalence RCTs of minimal goal-oriented versus usual antenatal care showed no difference in maternal mortality (1.09, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.25). The cohort studies were of low quality and did not contribute further evidence. CONCLUSION: Community-level interventions of improved perinatal care practices can bring about a reduction in maternal mortality. This challenges the view that investment in such interventions is not worthwhile. Programmes to improve maternal mortality should be evaluated using randomised controlled techniques to generate further evidence.

AB - BACKGROUND: The objective was to provide a systematic review of the effectiveness of community-level interventions to reduce maternal mortality. METHODS: We searched published papers using Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, CINAHL, BNI, CAB ABSTRACTS, IBSS, Web of Science, LILACS and African Index Medicus from inception or at least 1982 to June 2006; searched unpublished works using National Research Register website, metaRegister and the WHO International Trial Registry portal. We hand searched major references.Selection criteria were maternity or childbearing age women, comparative study designs with concurrent controls, community-level interventions and maternal death as an outcome. We carried out study selection, data abstraction and quality assessment independently in duplicate. RESULTS: We found five cluster randomised controlled trials (RCT) and eight cohort studies of community-level interventions. We summarised results as odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI), combined using the Peto method for meta-analysis. Two high quality cluster RCTs, aimed at improving perinatal care practices, showed a reduction in maternal mortality reaching statistical significance (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.98). Three equivalence RCTs of minimal goal-oriented versus usual antenatal care showed no difference in maternal mortality (1.09, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.25). The cohort studies were of low quality and did not contribute further evidence. CONCLUSION: Community-level interventions of improved perinatal care practices can bring about a reduction in maternal mortality. This challenges the view that investment in such interventions is not worthwhile. Programmes to improve maternal mortality should be evaluated using randomised controlled techniques to generate further evidence.

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2393-9-2

DO - 10.1186/1471-2393-9-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 19154588

VL - 9

JO - BMC pregnancy and childbirth

JF - BMC pregnancy and childbirth

SN - 1471-2393

M1 - 2

ER -