Systematic review and meta-analysis of hydrocarbon exposure and the risk of Parkinson's disease

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@article{c4ecc58850b24bca9573543530ae2b1b,
title = "Systematic review and meta-analysis of hydrocarbon exposure and the risk of Parkinson's disease",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the association between exposure to hydrocarbons and the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarise the epidemiological evidence and included a new large case-control study.METHODS: Data were extracted following a predefined protocol. Risk estimates regarding the association between hydrocarbon exposure and PD were consolidated to produce a summary odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and p-value. In our case-control study, 1463 PD patients and 685 controls were recruited from clinical trials and completed a structured questionnaire describing their previous working exposure to hydrocarbons and other demographic measures. The association between exposure to hydrocarbons and risk of PD was evaluated using logistic regression.RESULTS: The systematic search identified 13 case-control studies matching the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis included 3020 PD cases and 6494 controls. The summary OR was 1.32 (95% CI 1.08-1.62, p = 0.006) for hydrocarbon exposure (ever versus never). In the PD GEN study, occupational exposure to hydrocarbons significantly increased the risk of PD (OR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.10-2.36, p = 0.014), and risk dose-dependently increased for subjects exposed greater than 10 years compared to subjects never exposed (OR = 2.19; 95% CI 1.13-4.26, p = 0.021). The addition of PD GEN data increased the total numbers to 4483 PD cases and 7179 controls and strengthened the significant association (summary OR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.13-1.63, p = 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review supports a positive association between hydrocarbon exposure and PD. Data from prospective studies are required to reinforce the relationship between hydrocarbon exposure and PD.",
keywords = "Parkinson's disease, Hydrocarbons, Occupational exposure, Case-control, Epidemiology",
author = "Oliver Palin and Clare Herd and Karen Morrison and Jagielski, {Alison C} and Keith Wheatley and Thomas, {G Neil} and Clarke, {Carl E}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2015",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.12.017",
language = "English",
journal = "Parkinsonism and Related Disorders",
issn = "1353-8020",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Systematic review and meta-analysis of hydrocarbon exposure and the risk of Parkinson's disease

AU - Palin, Oliver

AU - Herd, Clare

AU - Morrison, Karen

AU - Jagielski, Alison C

AU - Wheatley, Keith

AU - Thomas, G Neil

AU - Clarke, Carl E

N1 - Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2015/3

Y1 - 2015/3

N2 - BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the association between exposure to hydrocarbons and the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarise the epidemiological evidence and included a new large case-control study.METHODS: Data were extracted following a predefined protocol. Risk estimates regarding the association between hydrocarbon exposure and PD were consolidated to produce a summary odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and p-value. In our case-control study, 1463 PD patients and 685 controls were recruited from clinical trials and completed a structured questionnaire describing their previous working exposure to hydrocarbons and other demographic measures. The association between exposure to hydrocarbons and risk of PD was evaluated using logistic regression.RESULTS: The systematic search identified 13 case-control studies matching the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis included 3020 PD cases and 6494 controls. The summary OR was 1.32 (95% CI 1.08-1.62, p = 0.006) for hydrocarbon exposure (ever versus never). In the PD GEN study, occupational exposure to hydrocarbons significantly increased the risk of PD (OR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.10-2.36, p = 0.014), and risk dose-dependently increased for subjects exposed greater than 10 years compared to subjects never exposed (OR = 2.19; 95% CI 1.13-4.26, p = 0.021). The addition of PD GEN data increased the total numbers to 4483 PD cases and 7179 controls and strengthened the significant association (summary OR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.13-1.63, p = 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review supports a positive association between hydrocarbon exposure and PD. Data from prospective studies are required to reinforce the relationship between hydrocarbon exposure and PD.

AB - BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the association between exposure to hydrocarbons and the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarise the epidemiological evidence and included a new large case-control study.METHODS: Data were extracted following a predefined protocol. Risk estimates regarding the association between hydrocarbon exposure and PD were consolidated to produce a summary odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and p-value. In our case-control study, 1463 PD patients and 685 controls were recruited from clinical trials and completed a structured questionnaire describing their previous working exposure to hydrocarbons and other demographic measures. The association between exposure to hydrocarbons and risk of PD was evaluated using logistic regression.RESULTS: The systematic search identified 13 case-control studies matching the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis included 3020 PD cases and 6494 controls. The summary OR was 1.32 (95% CI 1.08-1.62, p = 0.006) for hydrocarbon exposure (ever versus never). In the PD GEN study, occupational exposure to hydrocarbons significantly increased the risk of PD (OR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.10-2.36, p = 0.014), and risk dose-dependently increased for subjects exposed greater than 10 years compared to subjects never exposed (OR = 2.19; 95% CI 1.13-4.26, p = 0.021). The addition of PD GEN data increased the total numbers to 4483 PD cases and 7179 controls and strengthened the significant association (summary OR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.13-1.63, p = 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review supports a positive association between hydrocarbon exposure and PD. Data from prospective studies are required to reinforce the relationship between hydrocarbon exposure and PD.

KW - Parkinson's disease

KW - Hydrocarbons

KW - Occupational exposure

KW - Case-control

KW - Epidemiology

U2 - 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.12.017

DO - 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.12.017

M3 - Article

C2 - 25577023

JO - Parkinsonism and Related Disorders

JF - Parkinsonism and Related Disorders

SN - 1353-8020

ER -