Structured training in assessment increases confidence amongst basic life support instructors

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Structured training in assessment increases confidence amongst basic life support instructors. / Thorne, Christopher J.; Jones, Christopher; Coffin, Nicholas J.; Hulme, Jonathan; Owen, Andrew.

In: Resuscitation, Vol. 93, 01.08.2015, p. 58-62.

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Thorne, Christopher J. ; Jones, Christopher ; Coffin, Nicholas J. ; Hulme, Jonathan ; Owen, Andrew. / Structured training in assessment increases confidence amongst basic life support instructors. In: Resuscitation. 2015 ; Vol. 93. pp. 58-62.

Bibtex

@article{57fd68fa9e2a4890a081565873646a26,
title = "Structured training in assessment increases confidence amongst basic life support instructors",
abstract = "Aim Assessment skills are often neglected in resuscitation training and it has been shown that the ERC BLS/AED instructor course may be insufficient to prepare candidates for an assessment role. We have introduced an Assessment Training Programme (ATP) to improve assessors{\textquoteright} decision making. In this article we present our ATP and an observational study of candidates{\textquoteright} confidence levels upon completing both an ERC BLS/AED instructor course and our ATP. Methods Forty-seven candidates undertook the ERC instructor course and 20 qualified ERC BLS/AED instructors undertook the ATP. Pre- and post-course questionnaires were completed. Confidence was assessed on ten-point Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Results Overall confidence on the ERC BLS/AED instructor course rose from 5.9 (SD 1.8) to 8.7 (SD 1.4) (P < 0.001). A more modest improvement was witnessed on the ATP, rising from 8.2 (SD 1.4) to 9.6 (SD 0.5) (P < 0.001). Upon completion of their respective courses, assessors (mean 9.6, SD 0.5) were significantly more confident at assessing than instructors (mean 8.7, SD 0.5) (P < 0.001). Confidence in assessing individual algorithm components was similar on both courses. On the post-course questionnaire those on the ATP remained significantly more confident at assessing borderline candidates compared to instructors (P < 0.001), with no difference for clear pass (P = 0.067) or clear fail (P = 0.060) candidates. Conclusion The ATP raises the confidence of assessing BLS/AED candidates to a level above that of the ERC instructor course alone. We advocate that resuscitation organisations consider integrating an ATP into their existing training structure.",
keywords = "Basic life support (BLS), Adult, assessment, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), 2010 European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines",
author = "Thorne, {Christopher J.} and Christopher Jones and Coffin, {Nicholas J.} and Jonathan Hulme and Andrew Owen",
year = "2015",
month = aug,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.05.028",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "58--62",
journal = "Resuscitation",
issn = "0300-9572",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Structured training in assessment increases confidence amongst basic life support instructors

AU - Thorne, Christopher J.

AU - Jones, Christopher

AU - Coffin, Nicholas J.

AU - Hulme, Jonathan

AU - Owen, Andrew

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - Aim Assessment skills are often neglected in resuscitation training and it has been shown that the ERC BLS/AED instructor course may be insufficient to prepare candidates for an assessment role. We have introduced an Assessment Training Programme (ATP) to improve assessors’ decision making. In this article we present our ATP and an observational study of candidates’ confidence levels upon completing both an ERC BLS/AED instructor course and our ATP. Methods Forty-seven candidates undertook the ERC instructor course and 20 qualified ERC BLS/AED instructors undertook the ATP. Pre- and post-course questionnaires were completed. Confidence was assessed on ten-point Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Results Overall confidence on the ERC BLS/AED instructor course rose from 5.9 (SD 1.8) to 8.7 (SD 1.4) (P < 0.001). A more modest improvement was witnessed on the ATP, rising from 8.2 (SD 1.4) to 9.6 (SD 0.5) (P < 0.001). Upon completion of their respective courses, assessors (mean 9.6, SD 0.5) were significantly more confident at assessing than instructors (mean 8.7, SD 0.5) (P < 0.001). Confidence in assessing individual algorithm components was similar on both courses. On the post-course questionnaire those on the ATP remained significantly more confident at assessing borderline candidates compared to instructors (P < 0.001), with no difference for clear pass (P = 0.067) or clear fail (P = 0.060) candidates. Conclusion The ATP raises the confidence of assessing BLS/AED candidates to a level above that of the ERC instructor course alone. We advocate that resuscitation organisations consider integrating an ATP into their existing training structure.

AB - Aim Assessment skills are often neglected in resuscitation training and it has been shown that the ERC BLS/AED instructor course may be insufficient to prepare candidates for an assessment role. We have introduced an Assessment Training Programme (ATP) to improve assessors’ decision making. In this article we present our ATP and an observational study of candidates’ confidence levels upon completing both an ERC BLS/AED instructor course and our ATP. Methods Forty-seven candidates undertook the ERC instructor course and 20 qualified ERC BLS/AED instructors undertook the ATP. Pre- and post-course questionnaires were completed. Confidence was assessed on ten-point Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Results Overall confidence on the ERC BLS/AED instructor course rose from 5.9 (SD 1.8) to 8.7 (SD 1.4) (P < 0.001). A more modest improvement was witnessed on the ATP, rising from 8.2 (SD 1.4) to 9.6 (SD 0.5) (P < 0.001). Upon completion of their respective courses, assessors (mean 9.6, SD 0.5) were significantly more confident at assessing than instructors (mean 8.7, SD 0.5) (P < 0.001). Confidence in assessing individual algorithm components was similar on both courses. On the post-course questionnaire those on the ATP remained significantly more confident at assessing borderline candidates compared to instructors (P < 0.001), with no difference for clear pass (P = 0.067) or clear fail (P = 0.060) candidates. Conclusion The ATP raises the confidence of assessing BLS/AED candidates to a level above that of the ERC instructor course alone. We advocate that resuscitation organisations consider integrating an ATP into their existing training structure.

KW - Basic life support (BLS)

KW - Adult

KW - assessment

KW - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

KW - 2010 European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines

U2 - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.05.028

DO - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.05.028

M3 - Article

VL - 93

SP - 58

EP - 62

JO - Resuscitation

JF - Resuscitation

SN - 0300-9572

ER -