Self-management of health care behaviors for COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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@article{63af397716344f668dbdca1770c84d78,
title = "Self-management of health care behaviors for COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Purpose: This systematic review aimed to identify the most effective components of interventions to facilitate self-management of health care behaviors for patients with COPD. PROSPERO registration number CRD42011001588. Methods: We used standard review methods with a systematic search to May 2012 for randomized controlled trials of self-management interventions reporting hospital admissions or health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Mean differences (MD), hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Effects among different subgroups of interventions were explored including single/multiple components and multicomponent interventions with/without exercise. Results: One hundred and seventy-three randomized controlled trials were identified. Self-management interventions had a minimal effect on hospital admission rates. Multicomponent interventions improved HRQoL (studies with follow-up >6 months St George{\textquoteright}s Respiratory Questionnaire (MD 2.40, 95% CI 0.75–4.04, I2 57.9). Exercise was an effective individual component (St George{\textquoteright}s Respiratory Questionnaire at 3 months MD 4.87, 95% CI 3.96–5.79, I2 0%). Conclusion: While many self-management interventions increased HRQoL, little effect was seen on hospital admissions. More trials should report admissions and follow-up participants beyond the end of the intervention.",
keywords = "COPD, self-management, systematic review, meta-analysis",
author = "Kate Jolly and Saimma Majothi and Alice Sitch and Nicola Heneghan and David Moore and Richard Riley and Elizabeth Bates and Alice Turner and Sue Bayliss and Malcolm Price and Sally Singh and Peymane Adab and David Fitzmaurice and Rachel Jordan",
year = "2016",
month = feb,
day = "17",
doi = "10.2147/COPD.S90812",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "305--326",
journal = "International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease",
issn = "1176-9106",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-management of health care behaviors for COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Jolly, Kate

AU - Majothi, Saimma

AU - Sitch, Alice

AU - Heneghan, Nicola

AU - Moore, David

AU - Riley, Richard

AU - Bates, Elizabeth

AU - Turner, Alice

AU - Bayliss, Sue

AU - Price, Malcolm

AU - Singh, Sally

AU - Adab, Peymane

AU - Fitzmaurice, David

AU - Jordan, Rachel

PY - 2016/2/17

Y1 - 2016/2/17

N2 - Purpose: This systematic review aimed to identify the most effective components of interventions to facilitate self-management of health care behaviors for patients with COPD. PROSPERO registration number CRD42011001588. Methods: We used standard review methods with a systematic search to May 2012 for randomized controlled trials of self-management interventions reporting hospital admissions or health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Mean differences (MD), hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Effects among different subgroups of interventions were explored including single/multiple components and multicomponent interventions with/without exercise. Results: One hundred and seventy-three randomized controlled trials were identified. Self-management interventions had a minimal effect on hospital admission rates. Multicomponent interventions improved HRQoL (studies with follow-up >6 months St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (MD 2.40, 95% CI 0.75–4.04, I2 57.9). Exercise was an effective individual component (St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire at 3 months MD 4.87, 95% CI 3.96–5.79, I2 0%). Conclusion: While many self-management interventions increased HRQoL, little effect was seen on hospital admissions. More trials should report admissions and follow-up participants beyond the end of the intervention.

AB - Purpose: This systematic review aimed to identify the most effective components of interventions to facilitate self-management of health care behaviors for patients with COPD. PROSPERO registration number CRD42011001588. Methods: We used standard review methods with a systematic search to May 2012 for randomized controlled trials of self-management interventions reporting hospital admissions or health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Mean differences (MD), hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Effects among different subgroups of interventions were explored including single/multiple components and multicomponent interventions with/without exercise. Results: One hundred and seventy-three randomized controlled trials were identified. Self-management interventions had a minimal effect on hospital admission rates. Multicomponent interventions improved HRQoL (studies with follow-up >6 months St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (MD 2.40, 95% CI 0.75–4.04, I2 57.9). Exercise was an effective individual component (St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire at 3 months MD 4.87, 95% CI 3.96–5.79, I2 0%). Conclusion: While many self-management interventions increased HRQoL, little effect was seen on hospital admissions. More trials should report admissions and follow-up participants beyond the end of the intervention.

KW - COPD

KW - self-management

KW - systematic review

KW - meta-analysis

U2 - 10.2147/COPD.S90812

DO - 10.2147/COPD.S90812

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 305

EP - 326

JO - International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

JF - International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

SN - 1176-9106

IS - 1

ER -