Self-efficacy beliefs mediate the association between pain intensity and pain interference in acute/subacute whiplash-associated disorders

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Self-efficacy beliefs mediate the association between pain intensity and pain interference in acute/subacute whiplash-associated disorders. / Pedrero-Martin, Yolanda; Falla, Deborah; Martinez-Calderon, Javier; Liew, Bernard X W; Scutari, Marco; Luque-Suarez, Alejandro.

In: European Spine Journal, 27.01.2021.

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Pedrero-Martin, Yolanda ; Falla, Deborah ; Martinez-Calderon, Javier ; Liew, Bernard X W ; Scutari, Marco ; Luque-Suarez, Alejandro. / Self-efficacy beliefs mediate the association between pain intensity and pain interference in acute/subacute whiplash-associated disorders. In: European Spine Journal. 2021.

Bibtex

@article{98cf8a61cfb54619a1d3bb7ff0aa687e,
title = "Self-efficacy beliefs mediate the association between pain intensity and pain interference in acute/subacute whiplash-associated disorders",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To evaluate whether a set of pre-accident demographic, accident-related, post-accident treatment and psychosocial factors assessed in people with acute/subacute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) mediate the association between pain intensity and: (1) pain interference and (2) expectations of recovery, using Bayesian networks (BNs) analyses. This study also explored the potential mediating pathways (if any) between different psychosocial factors.METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on a sample of 173 participants with acute/subacute WAD. Pain intensity, pain interference, pessimism, expectations of recovery, pain catastrophizing, and self-efficacy beliefs were assessed. BN analyses were conducted to analyse the mediating effects of psychological factors on the association between pain intensity and pain-related outcomes.RESULTS: The results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs partially mediated the association between pain intensity and pain interference. Kinesiophobia partially mediated the association between self-efficacy and pain catastrophizing. Psychological factors did not mediate the association between pain intensity and expectations of recovery.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that individuals with acute/subacute WAD may present with lesser pain interference associated with a determined pain intensity value when they show greater self-efficacy beliefs. As the cross-sectional nature of this study limits firm conclusions on the causal impact, researchers are encouraged to investigate the role that patient's self-efficacy beliefs play in the transition to chronic WAD via longitudinal study designs.",
keywords = "Acute, Neck pain, Observational study, Psychological factors, Whiplash",
author = "Yolanda Pedrero-Martin and Deborah Falla and Javier Martinez-Calderon and Liew, {Bernard X W} and Marco Scutari and Alejandro Luque-Suarez",
note = "Funding Information: Dr. Javier Martinez-Calderon is supported by the Universidad de Malaga through a postdoctoral grant. All authors state that they have no conflicts of interest to declare. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH, DE part of Springer Nature.",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "27",
doi = "10.1007/s00586-021-06731-5",
language = "English",
journal = "European Spine Journal",
issn = "0940-6719",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-efficacy beliefs mediate the association between pain intensity and pain interference in acute/subacute whiplash-associated disorders

AU - Pedrero-Martin, Yolanda

AU - Falla, Deborah

AU - Martinez-Calderon, Javier

AU - Liew, Bernard X W

AU - Scutari, Marco

AU - Luque-Suarez, Alejandro

N1 - Funding Information: Dr. Javier Martinez-Calderon is supported by the Universidad de Malaga through a postdoctoral grant. All authors state that they have no conflicts of interest to declare. Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH, DE part of Springer Nature.

PY - 2021/1/27

Y1 - 2021/1/27

N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate whether a set of pre-accident demographic, accident-related, post-accident treatment and psychosocial factors assessed in people with acute/subacute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) mediate the association between pain intensity and: (1) pain interference and (2) expectations of recovery, using Bayesian networks (BNs) analyses. This study also explored the potential mediating pathways (if any) between different psychosocial factors.METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on a sample of 173 participants with acute/subacute WAD. Pain intensity, pain interference, pessimism, expectations of recovery, pain catastrophizing, and self-efficacy beliefs were assessed. BN analyses were conducted to analyse the mediating effects of psychological factors on the association between pain intensity and pain-related outcomes.RESULTS: The results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs partially mediated the association between pain intensity and pain interference. Kinesiophobia partially mediated the association between self-efficacy and pain catastrophizing. Psychological factors did not mediate the association between pain intensity and expectations of recovery.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that individuals with acute/subacute WAD may present with lesser pain interference associated with a determined pain intensity value when they show greater self-efficacy beliefs. As the cross-sectional nature of this study limits firm conclusions on the causal impact, researchers are encouraged to investigate the role that patient's self-efficacy beliefs play in the transition to chronic WAD via longitudinal study designs.

AB - PURPOSE: To evaluate whether a set of pre-accident demographic, accident-related, post-accident treatment and psychosocial factors assessed in people with acute/subacute whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) mediate the association between pain intensity and: (1) pain interference and (2) expectations of recovery, using Bayesian networks (BNs) analyses. This study also explored the potential mediating pathways (if any) between different psychosocial factors.METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on a sample of 173 participants with acute/subacute WAD. Pain intensity, pain interference, pessimism, expectations of recovery, pain catastrophizing, and self-efficacy beliefs were assessed. BN analyses were conducted to analyse the mediating effects of psychological factors on the association between pain intensity and pain-related outcomes.RESULTS: The results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs partially mediated the association between pain intensity and pain interference. Kinesiophobia partially mediated the association between self-efficacy and pain catastrophizing. Psychological factors did not mediate the association between pain intensity and expectations of recovery.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that individuals with acute/subacute WAD may present with lesser pain interference associated with a determined pain intensity value when they show greater self-efficacy beliefs. As the cross-sectional nature of this study limits firm conclusions on the causal impact, researchers are encouraged to investigate the role that patient's self-efficacy beliefs play in the transition to chronic WAD via longitudinal study designs.

KW - Acute

KW - Neck pain

KW - Observational study

KW - Psychological factors

KW - Whiplash

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85099945305&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00586-021-06731-5

DO - 10.1007/s00586-021-06731-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 33502610

JO - European Spine Journal

JF - European Spine Journal

SN - 0940-6719

ER -