Revised evidence for facultative sex ratio adjustment in birds: a correction.

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Revised evidence for facultative sex ratio adjustment in birds: a correction. / Cassey, Phillip; Ewen, JG; Møller, AP.

In: Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences, Vol. 273, No. 1605, 22.12.2006, p. 3129-30.

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@article{0ec3775ac13e4b7ca3c0f423f9df7887,
title = "Revised evidence for facultative sex ratio adjustment in birds: a correction.",
abstract = "We provide a revision to the calculation of effect sizes and heterogeneity statistics in our original article, 'Facultative primary sex ratio variation: a lack of evidence in birds' (Ewen et al. 2004). Our revision shows that significant heterogeneity in sex ratio study effect sizes does indeed exist and that for a series of key traits the average effect sizes (while still weak) are in fact significantly different from zero.",
author = "Phillip Cassey and JG Ewen and AP M{\o}ller",
year = "2006",
month = dec,
day = "22",
doi = "10.1098/rspb.2006.3628",
language = "English",
volume = "273",
pages = "3129--30",
journal = "Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8452",
publisher = "The Royal Society",
number = "1605",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Revised evidence for facultative sex ratio adjustment in birds: a correction.

AU - Cassey, Phillip

AU - Ewen, JG

AU - Møller, AP

PY - 2006/12/22

Y1 - 2006/12/22

N2 - We provide a revision to the calculation of effect sizes and heterogeneity statistics in our original article, 'Facultative primary sex ratio variation: a lack of evidence in birds' (Ewen et al. 2004). Our revision shows that significant heterogeneity in sex ratio study effect sizes does indeed exist and that for a series of key traits the average effect sizes (while still weak) are in fact significantly different from zero.

AB - We provide a revision to the calculation of effect sizes and heterogeneity statistics in our original article, 'Facultative primary sex ratio variation: a lack of evidence in birds' (Ewen et al. 2004). Our revision shows that significant heterogeneity in sex ratio study effect sizes does indeed exist and that for a series of key traits the average effect sizes (while still weak) are in fact significantly different from zero.

U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2006.3628

DO - 10.1098/rspb.2006.3628

M3 - Article

C2 - 17015370

VL - 273

SP - 3129

EP - 3130

JO - Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences

JF - Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8452

IS - 1605

ER -