Responses to exercise in the heat related to measures of hypothalamic serotonergic and dopmaninergic function

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Responses to exercise in the heat related to measures of hypothalamic serotonergic and dopmaninergic function. / Bridge, Matthew; Weller, AS; Rayson, Mark; Jones, David.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 89, No. 5, 01.06.2003, p. 451-459.

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@article{27a7231cfdb14df5b7c0f173b67bf29a,
title = "Responses to exercise in the heat related to measures of hypothalamic serotonergic and dopmaninergic function",
abstract = "We have studied 12 recreationally active men to measure their responses to exercise in the heat and relate these to measures of hypothalamic function explored with a buspirone [5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) agonist, dopaminergic D-2 antagonist] neuroendocrine challenge, with and without pretreatment with pindolol (5-HT1A antagonist). Pindolol treatment allowed the serotonergic and non-serotonergic components of prolactin release to be distinguished. Subjects exercised at 73 (5)% maximal rate of oxygen uptake ((V) over dot O-2max) until volitional fatigue at 35degreesC (relative humidity, 30%). On another two occasions they underwent a buspirone challenge [0.5 mg (kg body mass)(-1)], once with, and once without, pindolol [0.5 mg (ka body mass)(-1)] pretreatment and the circulating plasma concentrations of prolactin were measured for the next 2.5 h. Rectal temperature increased throughout exercise, whilst mean skin temperature remained constant. There was a wide inter-subject variation in prolactin response to the neuroendocrine challenges. The proportion of the prolactin response to buspirone attributable to a non-serotonergic component (most likely dopaminergic) correlated both with exercise duration (r=0.657, P=0.028), rectal temperature at fatigue (r=0.623, P=0.041) and the rate of temperature rise r=-0.669, P = 0.024). Our results suggest that high activity of the dopaminergic pathways in the hypothalamus is a predictor of exercise tolerance in the heat.",
keywords = "serotonin, heat tolerance, dopamine, prolactin, fatigue",
author = "Matthew Bridge and AS Weller and Mark Rayson and David Jones",
year = "2003",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00421-003-0800-z",
language = "English",
volume = "89",
pages = "451--459",
journal = "European Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "1439-6319",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Responses to exercise in the heat related to measures of hypothalamic serotonergic and dopmaninergic function

AU - Bridge, Matthew

AU - Weller, AS

AU - Rayson, Mark

AU - Jones, David

PY - 2003/6/1

Y1 - 2003/6/1

N2 - We have studied 12 recreationally active men to measure their responses to exercise in the heat and relate these to measures of hypothalamic function explored with a buspirone [5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) agonist, dopaminergic D-2 antagonist] neuroendocrine challenge, with and without pretreatment with pindolol (5-HT1A antagonist). Pindolol treatment allowed the serotonergic and non-serotonergic components of prolactin release to be distinguished. Subjects exercised at 73 (5)% maximal rate of oxygen uptake ((V) over dot O-2max) until volitional fatigue at 35degreesC (relative humidity, 30%). On another two occasions they underwent a buspirone challenge [0.5 mg (kg body mass)(-1)], once with, and once without, pindolol [0.5 mg (ka body mass)(-1)] pretreatment and the circulating plasma concentrations of prolactin were measured for the next 2.5 h. Rectal temperature increased throughout exercise, whilst mean skin temperature remained constant. There was a wide inter-subject variation in prolactin response to the neuroendocrine challenges. The proportion of the prolactin response to buspirone attributable to a non-serotonergic component (most likely dopaminergic) correlated both with exercise duration (r=0.657, P=0.028), rectal temperature at fatigue (r=0.623, P=0.041) and the rate of temperature rise r=-0.669, P = 0.024). Our results suggest that high activity of the dopaminergic pathways in the hypothalamus is a predictor of exercise tolerance in the heat.

AB - We have studied 12 recreationally active men to measure their responses to exercise in the heat and relate these to measures of hypothalamic function explored with a buspirone [5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) agonist, dopaminergic D-2 antagonist] neuroendocrine challenge, with and without pretreatment with pindolol (5-HT1A antagonist). Pindolol treatment allowed the serotonergic and non-serotonergic components of prolactin release to be distinguished. Subjects exercised at 73 (5)% maximal rate of oxygen uptake ((V) over dot O-2max) until volitional fatigue at 35degreesC (relative humidity, 30%). On another two occasions they underwent a buspirone challenge [0.5 mg (kg body mass)(-1)], once with, and once without, pindolol [0.5 mg (ka body mass)(-1)] pretreatment and the circulating plasma concentrations of prolactin were measured for the next 2.5 h. Rectal temperature increased throughout exercise, whilst mean skin temperature remained constant. There was a wide inter-subject variation in prolactin response to the neuroendocrine challenges. The proportion of the prolactin response to buspirone attributable to a non-serotonergic component (most likely dopaminergic) correlated both with exercise duration (r=0.657, P=0.028), rectal temperature at fatigue (r=0.623, P=0.041) and the rate of temperature rise r=-0.669, P = 0.024). Our results suggest that high activity of the dopaminergic pathways in the hypothalamus is a predictor of exercise tolerance in the heat.

KW - serotonin

KW - heat tolerance

KW - dopamine

KW - prolactin

KW - fatigue

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-003-0800-z

DO - 10.1007/s00421-003-0800-z

M3 - Article

C2 - 12684806

VL - 89

SP - 451

EP - 459

JO - European Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - European Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 1439-6319

IS - 5

ER -