Representing Attitudes to Welfare Dependency: Relational Geographies of Welfare

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Representing Attitudes to Welfare Dependency: Relational Geographies of Welfare. / Pykett, Jessica.

In: Sociological Research Online, Vol. 19, No. 3, 23, 15.08.2014.

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@article{49186fecc09f45e0994c5cd70d431d67,
title = "Representing Attitudes to Welfare Dependency: Relational Geographies of Welfare",
abstract = "This article outlines the recent circulation of media images and discourse relating to characters pre-figured as 'welfare dependents' and reaction to Benefits Street. The article provides a brief overview of sociological analyses of such representations of apparently spiralling 'cultures of dependency' and proposes an alternative relational geography approach to understanding existing welfare dynamics. It describes a shift from putative welfare dependency, to dependency on geographically uneven employment opportunities, low-wage dependency and dependency on a new migrant division of labour. It then contrasts this relational geography approach with the increasingly behaviourist overtones of contemporary welfare reform, which began under New Labour and have accelerated under the Coalition government since 2010. Such policies are in part reliant on the aforementioned media images in securing public acceptance. The article concludes by speculating on the apparent importance of Benefits Street in marking the possible 'end times' for the welfare state as we knew it.",
keywords = "Worklessness, Welfare Dependency, Welfare Conditionality, , Media Representations , Behaviour Change ",
author = "Jessica Pykett",
year = "2014",
month = aug,
day = "15",
doi = "10.5153/sro.3453",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
journal = "Sociological Research Online",
issn = "1360-7804",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Representing Attitudes to Welfare Dependency: Relational Geographies of Welfare

AU - Pykett, Jessica

PY - 2014/8/15

Y1 - 2014/8/15

N2 - This article outlines the recent circulation of media images and discourse relating to characters pre-figured as 'welfare dependents' and reaction to Benefits Street. The article provides a brief overview of sociological analyses of such representations of apparently spiralling 'cultures of dependency' and proposes an alternative relational geography approach to understanding existing welfare dynamics. It describes a shift from putative welfare dependency, to dependency on geographically uneven employment opportunities, low-wage dependency and dependency on a new migrant division of labour. It then contrasts this relational geography approach with the increasingly behaviourist overtones of contemporary welfare reform, which began under New Labour and have accelerated under the Coalition government since 2010. Such policies are in part reliant on the aforementioned media images in securing public acceptance. The article concludes by speculating on the apparent importance of Benefits Street in marking the possible 'end times' for the welfare state as we knew it.

AB - This article outlines the recent circulation of media images and discourse relating to characters pre-figured as 'welfare dependents' and reaction to Benefits Street. The article provides a brief overview of sociological analyses of such representations of apparently spiralling 'cultures of dependency' and proposes an alternative relational geography approach to understanding existing welfare dynamics. It describes a shift from putative welfare dependency, to dependency on geographically uneven employment opportunities, low-wage dependency and dependency on a new migrant division of labour. It then contrasts this relational geography approach with the increasingly behaviourist overtones of contemporary welfare reform, which began under New Labour and have accelerated under the Coalition government since 2010. Such policies are in part reliant on the aforementioned media images in securing public acceptance. The article concludes by speculating on the apparent importance of Benefits Street in marking the possible 'end times' for the welfare state as we knew it.

KW - Worklessness

KW - Welfare Dependency

KW - Welfare Conditionality

KW - , Media Representations

KW - Behaviour Change

U2 - 10.5153/sro.3453

DO - 10.5153/sro.3453

M3 - Article

VL - 19

JO - Sociological Research Online

JF - Sociological Research Online

SN - 1360-7804

IS - 3

M1 - 23

ER -