Relationship continuity and person-centred care: an exploratory mixed-methods investigation of spousal partners' responses to the challenging care needs of those with acquired brain injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

Some partners of people with an acquired brain injury experience the person with the injury and their relationship as continuous with the pre-injury person and relationship, but others experience the person and relationship as very different to what went before. Previous qualitative research has suggested that the experience of continuity may promote a more person-centred approach to how partners respond to challenging care needs. Given the value of triangulating evidence, this exploratory study used a mixed-methods design to investigate this suggestion. Twenty-six partners of people with an acquired brain injury completed the Birmingham Relationship Continuity Measure and a semi-structured interview about their response to challenging care needs. Interviews were coded and scored to provide a measure of the extent to which the participants' understanding, management and emotional responses showed a person-centred approach. The findings supported the hypothesis. Greater continuity was significantly correlated with a more person-centred approach. Associating relationship continuity and person-centred care is a novel approach to the issue of how family relationships may impact on care quality. Person-centred care can have important benefits for both the giver and receiver of care. Whether it can be promoted through fostering a sense of continuity in the relationship merits further investigation.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Early online date15 Jan 2019
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 15 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • brain injury, family care, relationship continuity, person-centred care, challenging behaviour