Randomised controlled trial of a theory-based intervention to prompt front-line staff to take up the seasonal influenza vaccine

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Randomised controlled trial of a theory-based intervention to prompt front-line staff to take up the seasonal influenza vaccine. / Schmidtke, Kelly Ann; Nightingale, Peter G; Reeves, Katharine; Gallier, Suzy; Vlaev, Ivo; Watson, Samuel I; Lilford, Richard J.

In: BMJ Quality & Safety, Vol. 29, No. 3, 03.2020, p. 189-197.

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Schmidtke, Kelly Ann ; Nightingale, Peter G ; Reeves, Katharine ; Gallier, Suzy ; Vlaev, Ivo ; Watson, Samuel I ; Lilford, Richard J. / Randomised controlled trial of a theory-based intervention to prompt front-line staff to take up the seasonal influenza vaccine. In: BMJ Quality & Safety. 2020 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 189-197.

Bibtex

@article{4a2fa562c96f42068afc3d75d7471702,
title = "Randomised controlled trial of a theory-based intervention to prompt front-line staff to take up the seasonal influenza vaccine",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of reminder letters informed by social normative theory (a type of 'nudge theory') on uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination by front-line hospital staff.DESIGN: Individually randomised controlled trial.SETTING: A large acute care hospital in England.PARTICIPANTS: Front-line staff employed by the hospital (n=7540) were randomly allocated to one of four reminder types in a factorial design.INTERVENTIONS: The standard letter included only general information directing the staff to take up the vaccine. A second letter highlighted a type of social norm based on peer comparisons. A third letter highlighted a type of social norm based on an appeal to authority. A fourth letter included a combination of the social norms.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The proportion of hospital staff vaccinated on-site.RESULTS: Vaccine coverage was 43% (812/1885) in the standard letter group, 43% (818/1885) in the descriptive norms group, 43% (814/1885) in the injunctive norms group and 43% (812/1885) in the combination group. There were no statistically significant effects of either norm or the interaction. The OR for the descriptive norms factor is 1.01 (0.89-1.15) in the absence of the injunctive norms factor and 1.00 (0.88-1.13) in its presence. The OR for the injunctive norms factor is 1.00 (0.88-1.14) in the absence of the descriptive norms factor and 0.99 (0.87-1.12) in its presence.CONCLUSIONS: We find no evidence that the uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccination is affected by reminders using social norms to motivate uptake.",
keywords = "communication, health policy, infection control, randomised controlled trial",
author = "Schmidtke, {Kelly Ann} and Nightingale, {Peter G} and Katharine Reeves and Suzy Gallier and Ivo Vlaev and Watson, {Samuel I} and Lilford, {Richard J}",
note = "{\textcopyright} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY. Published by BMJ.",
year = "2020",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1136/bmjqs-2019-009775",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "189--197",
journal = "BMJ Quality & Safety",
issn = "2044-5415",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Randomised controlled trial of a theory-based intervention to prompt front-line staff to take up the seasonal influenza vaccine

AU - Schmidtke, Kelly Ann

AU - Nightingale, Peter G

AU - Reeves, Katharine

AU - Gallier, Suzy

AU - Vlaev, Ivo

AU - Watson, Samuel I

AU - Lilford, Richard J

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of reminder letters informed by social normative theory (a type of 'nudge theory') on uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination by front-line hospital staff.DESIGN: Individually randomised controlled trial.SETTING: A large acute care hospital in England.PARTICIPANTS: Front-line staff employed by the hospital (n=7540) were randomly allocated to one of four reminder types in a factorial design.INTERVENTIONS: The standard letter included only general information directing the staff to take up the vaccine. A second letter highlighted a type of social norm based on peer comparisons. A third letter highlighted a type of social norm based on an appeal to authority. A fourth letter included a combination of the social norms.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The proportion of hospital staff vaccinated on-site.RESULTS: Vaccine coverage was 43% (812/1885) in the standard letter group, 43% (818/1885) in the descriptive norms group, 43% (814/1885) in the injunctive norms group and 43% (812/1885) in the combination group. There were no statistically significant effects of either norm or the interaction. The OR for the descriptive norms factor is 1.01 (0.89-1.15) in the absence of the injunctive norms factor and 1.00 (0.88-1.13) in its presence. The OR for the injunctive norms factor is 1.00 (0.88-1.14) in the absence of the descriptive norms factor and 0.99 (0.87-1.12) in its presence.CONCLUSIONS: We find no evidence that the uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccination is affected by reminders using social norms to motivate uptake.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of reminder letters informed by social normative theory (a type of 'nudge theory') on uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination by front-line hospital staff.DESIGN: Individually randomised controlled trial.SETTING: A large acute care hospital in England.PARTICIPANTS: Front-line staff employed by the hospital (n=7540) were randomly allocated to one of four reminder types in a factorial design.INTERVENTIONS: The standard letter included only general information directing the staff to take up the vaccine. A second letter highlighted a type of social norm based on peer comparisons. A third letter highlighted a type of social norm based on an appeal to authority. A fourth letter included a combination of the social norms.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The proportion of hospital staff vaccinated on-site.RESULTS: Vaccine coverage was 43% (812/1885) in the standard letter group, 43% (818/1885) in the descriptive norms group, 43% (814/1885) in the injunctive norms group and 43% (812/1885) in the combination group. There were no statistically significant effects of either norm or the interaction. The OR for the descriptive norms factor is 1.01 (0.89-1.15) in the absence of the injunctive norms factor and 1.00 (0.88-1.13) in its presence. The OR for the injunctive norms factor is 1.00 (0.88-1.14) in the absence of the descriptive norms factor and 0.99 (0.87-1.12) in its presence.CONCLUSIONS: We find no evidence that the uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccination is affected by reminders using social norms to motivate uptake.

KW - communication

KW - health policy

KW - infection control

KW - randomised controlled trial

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070722189&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bmjqs-2019-009775

DO - 10.1136/bmjqs-2019-009775

M3 - Article

C2 - 31383723

VL - 29

SP - 189

EP - 197

JO - BMJ Quality & Safety

JF - BMJ Quality & Safety

SN - 2044-5415

IS - 3

ER -