Pulse oximetry screening for congenital heart defects in newborn infants: an evaluation of acceptability to mothers

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Introducing neonatal screening procedures may not be readily accepted by parents and may increase anxiety. The acceptability of pulse oximetry screening to parents has not been previously reported. OBJECTIVE: To assess maternal acceptability of pulse oximetry screening for congenital heart defects and to identify factors predictive of participation in screening. DESIGN AND SETTING: A questionnaire was completed by a cross-sectional sample of mothers whose babies were recruited into the PulseOx Study which investigated the test accuracy of pulse oximetry screening. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 119 mothers of babies with false-positive (FP) results, 15 with true-positive and 679 with true-negative results following screening. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questionnaires included measures of satisfaction with screening, anxiety, depression and perceptions of test results. RESULTS: Participants were predominantly satisfied with screening. The anxiety of mothers given FP results was not significantly higher than that of mothers given true-negative results (median score 32.7 vs 30.0, p=0.09). White British/Irish mothers were more likely to participate in screening, with a decline rate of 5%; other ethnic groups were more likely to decline with the largest increase in declining being for Black African mothers (21%, OR 4.6, 95% CI 3.8 to 5.5). White British mothers were also less anxious (p

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)F59-F63
JournalArchives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2012