Public, Private or Neither? Analysing the publicness of health care social enterprises

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@article{d4892c4963b34024a74487a6cc1391ad,
title = "Public, Private or Neither? Analysing the publicness of health care social enterprises",
abstract = "Social enterprises have been actively encouraged to spin out of the National Health Service (NHS) on the grounds that they can deliver more innovative, cost-efficient and responsive services. This is arguably achieved through a combination of the best of the public, third and private sectors. This article explores this idea by bringing together empirical data from interviews with NHS spin-outs and a framework of ‘publicness’. By focusing on NHS spin-outs, we look at what happens to an organization’s publicness when it leaves the public sector yet continues to deliver publicly funded services.",
keywords = "Social enterprise, publicness, spin out, right to request, health",
author = "Kelly Hall and Robin Miller and Ross Millar",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/14719037.2015.1014398",
language = "English",
journal = "Public Management Review",
issn = "1471-9037",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Public, Private or Neither? Analysing the publicness of health care social enterprises

AU - Hall, Kelly

AU - Miller, Robin

AU - Millar, Ross

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Social enterprises have been actively encouraged to spin out of the National Health Service (NHS) on the grounds that they can deliver more innovative, cost-efficient and responsive services. This is arguably achieved through a combination of the best of the public, third and private sectors. This article explores this idea by bringing together empirical data from interviews with NHS spin-outs and a framework of ‘publicness’. By focusing on NHS spin-outs, we look at what happens to an organization’s publicness when it leaves the public sector yet continues to deliver publicly funded services.

AB - Social enterprises have been actively encouraged to spin out of the National Health Service (NHS) on the grounds that they can deliver more innovative, cost-efficient and responsive services. This is arguably achieved through a combination of the best of the public, third and private sectors. This article explores this idea by bringing together empirical data from interviews with NHS spin-outs and a framework of ‘publicness’. By focusing on NHS spin-outs, we look at what happens to an organization’s publicness when it leaves the public sector yet continues to deliver publicly funded services.

KW - Social enterprise, publicness, spin out, right to request, health

U2 - 10.1080/14719037.2015.1014398

DO - 10.1080/14719037.2015.1014398

M3 - Article

JO - Public Management Review

JF - Public Management Review

SN - 1471-9037

ER -